Ganymede

(redirected from Catamitus)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Catamitus: Ganymede

Gan·y·mede

 (găn′ə-mēd′)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A Trojan boy of great beauty whom Zeus carried away to be his lover and to be cupbearer to the gods.
2. One of the four brightest satellites of Jupiter. Originally sighted by Galileo, it is the largest satellite in the solar system.

[Latin Ganymēdēs, from Greek Ganumēdēs.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ganymede

(ˈɡænɪˌmiːd)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a beautiful Trojan youth who was abducted by Zeus to Olympus and made the cupbearer of the gods

Ganymede

(ˈɡænɪˌmiːd)
n
(Celestial Objects) the brightest and largest of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and the largest in the solar system. Diameter: 5262 km; orbital radius: 1 070 000 km
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Gan•y•mede

(ˈgæn əˌmid)

n.
1. a Trojan youth who was taken by Zeus to Olympus and made the cupbearer of the gods.
2. the largest moon of the planet Jupiter.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ganymede - (Greek mythology) a Trojan boy who was so beautiful that Zeus carried him away to serve as cupbearer to the gods
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
2.Ganymede - the largest of Jupiter's satellitesGanymede - the largest of Jupiter's satellites
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Ganymede

[ˈgænɪˌmiːd] nGanimede m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
(89) Catamitus era como se chamava o amante pre-adolescente ou adolescente numa relacao homossexual na Roma antiga.
In its sexual context this term would imply an ironic duality of passive versus aggressive: short like a boy (a passive sexual partner, pathicus, catamitus), yet aggressive like a grown man, where disertus = salax.
486, claims that such borrowings as pedico, pathicus, catamitus, and cinaedus `had to be explained to contemporary readers as novelties', but gives no evidence on these words, merely listing in a note further Greek words that in fact fail to support his argument.