catastrophe

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ca·tas·tro·phe

 (kə-tăs′trə-fē)
n.
1. A great, often sudden calamity.
2. A complete failure; a fiasco: The food was cold, the guests quarreled—the whole dinner was a catastrophe.
3. The concluding action of a drama, especially a classical tragedy, following the climax and containing a resolution of the plot.
4. A sudden violent change in the earth's surface; a cataclysm.

[Greek katastrophē, an overturning, ruin, conclusion, from katastrephein, to ruin, undo : kata-, cata- + strephein, to turn; see streb(h)- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

catastrophe

(kəˈtæstrəfɪ)
n
1. a sudden, extensive, or notable disaster or misfortune
2. (Theatre) the denouement of a play, esp a classical tragedy
3. a final decisive event, usually causing a disastrous end
4. (Geological Science) Also called: cataclysm any sudden and violent change in the earth's surface caused by flooding, earthquake, or some other rapid process
[C16: from Greek katastrophē, from katastrephein to overturn, from strephein to turn]
catastrophic adj
ˌcataˈstrophically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ca•tas•tro•phe

(kəˈtæs trə fi)

n.
1. a sudden and widespread disaster.
2. any misfortune or failure; fiasco.
3. a disastrous end.
4. the point in a drama following the climax and introducing the conclusion.
5. a sudden, violent disturbance, esp. of a part of the surface of the earth.
[1570–80; < Greek katastrophḗ an overturning, n. derivative of katastréphein to overturn. See cata-, strophe]
cat•a•stroph•ic (ˌkæt əˈstrɒf ɪk) cat`a•stroph′i•cal, adj.
cat`a•stroph′i•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See disaster.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catastrophe - an event resulting in great loss and misfortunecatastrophe - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
act of God, force majeure, inevitable accident, unavoidable casualty, vis major - a natural and unavoidable catastrophe that interrupts the expected course of events; "he discovered that his house was not insured against acts of God"
apocalypse - a cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil
famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
kiss of death - something that is ruinous; "if this were known it would be the kiss of death for my political career"
meltdown - a disaster comparable to a nuclear meltdown; "there is little likelihood of a meltdown comparable to the American banking collapse in March 1933"
plague - any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
visitation - any disaster or catastrophe; "a visitation of the plague"
tidal wave - an unusual (and often destructive) rise of water along the seashore caused by a storm or a combination of wind and high tide
tsunami - a cataclysm resulting from a destructive sea wave caused by an earthquake or volcanic eruption; "a colossal tsunami destroyed the Minoan civilization in minutes"
2.catastrophe - a state of extreme (usually irremediable) ruin and misfortunecatastrophe - a state of extreme (usually irremediable) ruin and misfortune; "lack of funds has resulted in a catastrophe for our school system"; "his policies were a disaster"
adversity, hard knocks, hardship - a state of misfortune or affliction; "debt-ridden farmers struggling with adversity"; "a life of hardship"
3.catastrophe - a sudden violent change in the earth's surface
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
nuclear winter - a long period of darkness and extreme cold that scientists predict would follow a full-scale nuclear war; a layer of dust and smoke in the atmosphere would cover the earth and block the rays of the sun; most living organisms would perish
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

catastrophe

noun disaster, tragedy, calamity, meltdown (informal), cataclysm, trouble, trial, blow, failure, reverse, misfortune, devastation, adversity, mishap, affliction, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), bummer (slang), mischance, fiasco The world is heading towards an environmental catastrophe.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

catastrophe

noun
An occurrence inflicting widespread destruction and distress:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
كارِثَه، نَكْبَه، ، فاجِعَهنَكْبَة
katastrofa
katastrofe
katastrofi
katastrofa
katasztrófaszerencsétlenség
stórslys; náttúruhamfarir; hörmungarslys
大災害
대참사
katastrofakatastrofiškai
katastrofa
katastrof
ความหายนะ
âfetfelaketfelâket
tai họa

catastrophe

[kəˈtæstrəfɪ] Ncatástrofe f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

catastrophe

[kəˈtæstrəfi] ncatastrophe f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

catastrophe

nKatastrophe f; to end in catastropheverhängnisvoll or in einer Katastrophe enden; to be heading for catastropheauf eine Katastrophe zusteuern; to be the final catastrophe for somebodyjdm schließlich zum Verhängnis werden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

catastrophe

[kəˈtæstrəfɪ] ncatastrofe f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

catastrophe

(kəˈtӕstrəfi) noun
a sudden great disaster. earthquakes and other natural catastrophes; Her brother's death was a catastrophe for the family.
catastrophic (kӕtəˈstrofik) adjective
ˌcataˈstrophically adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

catastrophe

نَكْبَة katastrofa katastrofe Katastrophe καταστροφή catástrofe katastrofi catastrophe katastrofa catastrofe 大災害 대참사 catastrofe katastrofe katastrofa catástrofe катастрофа katastrof ความหายนะ felaket tai họa 大灾难
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

catastrophe

n catástrofe f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The New World seems to have made up its mind to live in peace; and our bellicose Tribune predicts some approaching catastrophes arising out of this scandalous increase of population."
We beg them to take one step backward, and to transport themselves, the morning of that day of great catastrophes, into the showy, gilded salon we have before shown them, and which was the pride of its owner, Baron Danglars.
He felt that the condition he was in could not continue long, that a catastrophe was coming which would change his whole life, and he impatiently sought everywhere for signs of that approaching catastrophe.
I do not know where I can find a better place than just here, to make mention of one or two other things, which to me seem important, as in printed form establishing in all respects the reasonableness of the whole story of the White Whale, more especially the catastrophe. For this is one of those disheartening instances where truth requires full as much bolstering as error.
The prediction cut curiously close to the truth; forty-one years after the catastrophe, the remains were cast forth at the foot of the glacier.
Like the Odyssey, it has a double thread of plot, and also an opposite catastrophe for the good and for the bad.
But everybody knew how perfect an instrument her voice was; and there was no display of anger, but only of horror and dismay, the sort of dismay which men would have felt if they had witnessed the catastrophe that broke the arms of the Venus de Milo.
The disappearance of the Beauforts would leave a considerable void in their compact little circle; and those who were too ignorant or too careless to shudder at the moral catastrophe bewailed in advance the loss of the best ball-room in New York.
The facts, however, will prove to be linked and banded together by one grand scheme, devised and conducted by a master spirit; one set of characters, also, continues throughout, appearing occasionally, though sometimes at long intervals, and the whole enterprise winds up by a regular catastrophe; so that the work, without any labored attempt at artificial construction, actually possesses much of that unity so much sought after in works of fiction, and considered so important to the interest of every history.
But to arrange this without catastrophe would need skill and tact; interference from any outside source would be fatal, and Francis meant to interfere
This work may, indeed, be considered as a great creation of our own; and for a little reptile of a critic to presume to find fault with any of its parts, without knowing the manner in which the whole is connected, and before he comes to the final catastrophe, is a most presumptuous absurdity.
Higginbotham's catastrophe, hinting, what the pedlar had discovered in his own dealings with him, that he was a crusty old fellow, as close as a vice.

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