catastrophism

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ca·tas·tro·phism

 (kə-tăs′trə-fĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The doctrine that major changes in the earth's crust result from sudden catastrophes, such as the impact of a large meteor, rather than from gradual evolutionary processes.
b. The doctrine that changes in the earth's fauna and flora result from major catastrophic events that cause the die-off of many organisms and are followed by the appearance of new types of organisms.
2. The prediction or expectation of cataclysmic upheaval, as in political or social developments.

ca·tas′tro·phist n.

catastrophism

(kəˈtæstrəˌfɪzəm)
n
1. (Geological Science) an old doctrine, now discarded, that the earth was created and has subsequently been shaped by sudden divine acts which have no logical connection with each other rather than by gradual evolutionary processes
2. (Geological Science) Also called: neo-catastrophism a modern doctrine that the gradual evolutionary processes shaping the earth have been supplemented in the past by the effects of huge natural catastrophes. Compare uniformitarianism, gradualism2
caˈtastrophist n

catastrophism

the theory that geological changes have been caused by sudden upheaval rather than by gradual and continuing processes. Cf. uniformitarianism.catastrophist, n.
See also: Geology
References in classic literature ?
I didn't commit murder," continued the Catastrophist mildly, "but only perjury.
She is the author of two books, Call the Catastrophists (BlazeVox, 2011) and Cray Market (1913 Press, 2016), and five chapbooks.
He has seen the chicanery of the catastrophists up close, and has proposed a scientific "debate" of sorts.
2014) Smaller, Faster, Lighter, Denser, Cheaper: How Innovation Keeps Proving the Catastrophists Wrong.
Evidence is stacking up against catastrophists and skeptics as emerging economies become major beneficiaries of the biotechnology revolution.
The Stoics in this sense would have probably sided (maybe like Poe himself) with the catastrophists of the 19th century, who--although they lost their battle against the uniformitarians and the evolutionists in that century (the real fight was between the notion of creation as operated by catastrophic quick evolution or by peaceful slow evolution) surely emerged as victors in the 20th century: the Big Bang catastrophic model became dominant in cosmology against the steady state models (cf.
Catastrophists will warn about the imminent downfall of the health service, whilst vested interests in the insurance industry will press for system change, replacing funding from central taxation with compulsory health insurance on the French or German model.
This was a room of catastrophists (as in "catastrophic global warming"), with the prevailing view .
Catastrophists tend to believe that an ever-intensified rhetoric of disaster will awaken the masses from their long slumber--if the mechanical failure of the system does not make such struggles superfluous.
Catastrophists assume that as conditions get worse the likelihood that they will get better improves.
Those who believed Earth had been essentially unchanged since the Creation were called catastrophists, a name that pointed to their central tenet that major catastrophic events occurring before recorded geologic time were responsible for the current contours of Earth.
He distinguished himself early as a poet in touch with avant-garde movements in Poland and European cultural centers and was associated in the 1930s with the Catastrophists, whose pessimism was soon borne out by events.