catbird

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Related to Catbirds: Dumetella carolinensis

cat·bird

 (kăt′bûrd′)
n.
1. A songbird (Dumetella carolinensis) of North and Central America having predominantly slate plumage and a cry like the mew of a cat.
2. Any of various other species of birds having a similar cry, especially one of several birds of Australia and New Guinea related to the bowerbirds.

catbird

(ˈkætˌbɜːd)
n
1. (Animals) any of several North American songbirds of the family Mimidae (mockingbirds), esp Dumetella carolinensis, whose call resembles the mewing of a cat
2. (Animals) any of several Australian bowerbirds of the genera Ailuroedus and Scenopoeetes, having a catlike call

cat•bird

(ˈkætˌbɜrd)

n.
a songbird with catlike vocalizations, esp. a common slate-colored member of the mockingbird family, Dumetella carolinensis, inhabiting the E and central U.S.
[1700–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catbird - any of various birds of the Australian region whose males build ornamented structures resembling bowers in order to attract femalescatbird - any of various birds of the Australian region whose males build ornamented structures resembling bowers in order to attract females
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
Ptilonorhynchus violaceus, satin bird, satin bowerbird - of southeast Australia; male is glossy violet blue; female is light grey-green
Chlamydera nuchalis, great bowerbird - large bowerbird of northern Australia
2.catbird - North American songbird whose call resembles a cat's mewingcatbird - North American songbird whose call resembles a cat's mewing
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
Translations

catbird

[ˈkætbɜːd] N to be (sitting) in the catbird seat (US) → sentirse seguro
References in classic literature ?
A catbird, the Northern mocker, lit in a tree over Tom's head, and trilled out her imitations of her neighbors in a rapture of enjoyment; then a shrill jay swept down, a flash of blue flame, and stopped on a twig almost within the boy's reach, cocked his head to one side and eyed the strangers with a consuming curiosity; a gray squirrel and a big fellow of the "fox" kind came skurrying along, sitting up at intervals to inspect and chatter at the boys, for the wild things had probably never seen a human being before and scarcely knew whether to be afraid or not.
muttered Hawkeye, with an inward laugh, "to go through life, like a catbird, mocking all the ups and downs that may happen to come out of other men's throats.
Wild vines entangled the trees and flaunted in their faces; brambles and briers caught their clothes as they passed; the garter snake glided across their path; the spotted toad hopped and waddled before them; and the restless catbird mewed at them from every thicket.
In this study we examine the leukocyte counts of gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) infected with eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV).
Previous studies confirmed that the death of baby gray catbirds in the Washington suburbs were 80 per cent caused by predators, of which 47 per cent were cats; because of the feline's domestication, they have few natural predators to reduce the cat population.
We have some gray catbirds and northern cardinals that are over 10 years old.
Researchers tracked the ironically named baby gray catbirds with tiny radio transmitters and discovered that nearly 80 percent of the birds killed were done in by predators, of whom cats represented 47 percent.
Predation was so serious in some areas that the catbirds could not replace their numbers for the next generation, said the researchers.
Sunflower seeds: bluebirds, buntings, cardinals, catbirds, chickadees, doves, finches, grosbeaks, jays, juncos, mockingbirds, nuthatches, pigeons, robins, siskins, sparrows, thrashers, titmice, towhees, woodpeckers
More than 45 different species have been spotted on the property, including great blue herons, gray catbirds, ducks, turkeys and prairie warblers.
Gray Catbirds nested in Cornus (N = 11 nests), Lonicera (N = 5), and Rubus (N = 6), but proportions were not significantly different ([chi square] = 2.
7% of the avian-derived blood meals were obtained from gray catbirds and 20.