Carthage

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Car·thage

 (kär′thĭj)
An ancient city and state of northern Africa on the Bay of Tunis northeast of modern Tunis. It was founded by the Phoenicians in the ninth century bc and became the center of a maritime empire in the Mediterranean after the sixth century bc. The city was destroyed by the Romans at the end of the Third Punic War (146 bc) but was rebuilt by Julius Caesar and later (ad 439-533) served as capital of the Vandals before its virtual annihilation by the Arabs (698).

Car′tha·gin′i·an (kär′thə-jĭn′ē-ən) adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Carthage

(ˈkɑːθɪdʒ)
n
(Placename) an ancient city state, on the N African coast near present-day Tunis. Founded about 800 bc by Phoenician traders, it grew into an empire dominating N Africa and the Mediterranean. Destroyed and then rebuilt by Rome, it was finally razed by the Arabs in 697 ad. See also Punic Wars
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Car•thage

(ˈkɑr θɪdʒ)

n.
an ancient city-state in N Africa near modern Tunis: founded by the Phoenicians in the 9th cent. B.C.; destroyed 146 B.C. in the last Punic War.
Car•tha•gin•i•an (ˌkɑr θəˈdʒɪn i ən) n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Carthage - an ancient city state on the north African coast near modern Tunis; founded by Phoenicians; destroyed and rebuilt by Romans; razed by Arabs in 697
Phenicia, Phoenicia - an ancient maritime country (a collection of city states) at eastern end of the Mediterranean
Carthaginian - a native or inhabitant of ancient Carthage
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قرطاج
Картаген
Cartago
Kartágo
Karthago
Kartago
Kartaago
Karthago
קרתגו
Kartaga
Karthágó
Kartago
Karþagó
カルタゴ
Karthago
Kartagina
Kartāga
Karthago
Kartagina
Cartago
Cartagina
Kartágo
Kartagina
Картагина
Karthago
Karthago
Kartaca
Карфаген

Carthage

[ˈkɑːθɪdʒ] NCartago f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Carthage

nKarthago nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Carthage

[ˈkɑːθɪdʒ] nCartagine f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
It is by this partition of cares descending in gradation from general to particular that the mass of human affairs may be best managed for the good and prosperity of all." (12) He even went so far as to write Joseph Cabell in 1816 that "As Cato then concluded every speech with the words, 'Cathago delenda est,' so do I every opinion with the injunction, 'divide the counties into wards.'" (13)
Son-in-law of the famous Hamilcar Barca, he succeeded that general in Iberia after Hamilcar fell in battle (228); continued Hamilcar's policy of expanding Carthaginian control in Iberia, pacifying the Spaniards, and diplomatically appeasing Roman interests in Iberia; founded Cathago Nova (New Carthage, now called Cartagena); concluded a treaty with Rome dividing Spain into Carthaginian and Roman spheres of influence along the Ebro River (late 226); assassinated, he was succeeded by his brother-in-law Hannibal (autumn 221).