Catherine I


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Related to Catherine I: Catherine II, Catherine the Great

Cath·e·rine I

 (kăth′ər-ĭn, kăth′rĭn) 1684?-1727.
Empress of Russia (1725-1727) as successor to her husband, Peter the Great. She founded the Russian Academy of Sciences (1725).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Catherine I

n
(Biography) ?1684–1727, second wife of Peter the Great, whom she succeeded as empress of Russia (1725–27)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Catherine I - empress of Russia who succeeded her husband Peter the Great (1684-1727)
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References in classic literature ?
Lady Catherine is far from requiring that elegance of dress in us which becomes herself and her daughter.
Guests will see the Empress Catherine I's lavish summer palace in Pushkin, then head back to St Petersburg to visit St Isaac's Cathedral, relax with a typical Russian lunch, explore the truly astounding art of the worldclass Hermitage Museum and round off the day with time for souvenir shopping (a Russian doll, perhaps?).
Catherine to legitimize Catherine I's coronation as Peter's empress and later as ruler in her own right.
For all the members of the house, except for Catherine I, Heathcliff is an intruder, who, by becoming the father's favourite, will alter the family's balance of power and authority.
As Catherine I and Ada reach the age of sexual development their "magic objet" acquires another aspect as the vehicle of sensuous desire, therefore a fetish of their passion.
Heathcliff's reaction at his rejection by Catherine I is similarly violent, though it is not directed against Catherine I herself but against both the Lintons and the Earnshaws and against women in general as representatives of gender difference and of the sexual impulse that has caused his disgrace.
Catherine II is termed the only eighteenth-century ruler not to have a Russian parent, but the significance of Catherine I's foreign parentage is forgotten.