catkin

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cat·kin

 (kăt′kĭn)
n.
A dense, cylindrical, often drooping cluster of unisexual apetalous flowers found especially in willows, birches, and oaks. Also called ament.

[From obsolete Dutch katteken, kitten, diminutive of katte, cat (from its resemblance to a kitten's tail), from Germanic *kattuz.]

catkin

(ˈkætkɪn)
n
(Botany) an inflorescence consisting of a spike, usually hanging, of much reduced flowers of either sex: occurs in birch, hazel, etc. Also called: ament
[C16: from obsolete Dutch katteken kitten, identical in meaning with French chaton, German Kätzchen]

cat•kin

(ˈkæt kɪn)

n.
a spike of unisexual flowers with scaly bracts and no petals, as on the willow or birch.
Also called ament.
[1570–80; < Dutch katteken little cat (now obsolete)]
cat′kin•ate` (-kəˌneɪt) adj.

cat·kin

(kăt′kĭn)
A long, thin cluster of tiny, petalless flowers growing on willows, birches, oaks, poplars, and certain other trees. The flowers on a catkin are either all male or all female. See more at flower.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catkin - a cylindrical spikelike inflorescencecatkin - a cylindrical spikelike inflorescence
inflorescence - the flowering part of a plant or arrangement of flowers on a stalk
Translations
尾状花序

catkin

[ˈkætkɪn] Namento m, candelilla f

catkin

[ˈkætkɪn] n [hazel] → chaton mcat litter nlitière f (pour chats)

catkin

[ˈkætkɪn] n (Bot) → amento, gattino
References in classic literature ?
Walking some forty paces away, Sergey Ivanovitch, knowing he was out of sight, stood still behind a bushy spindle-tree in full flower with its rosy red catkins.
I was standing with Rachel beside the water, amusing the laughing baby in her arms with a twig of willow laden with golden catkins, when, greatly to my surprise, he entered the park, mounted on his costly black hunter, and crossed over the grass to meet me.
Trees are coming back into leaf with bursting buds and catkins, snowdrops are growing and bluebells are blooming at the local nature reserve.
The abundance of catkins also suggests that it will remain cold with further frost and snow, as nature has provided extra food for the birds.
Elder looks good and provides food for birds and humans Yellow catkins Holly makes a safe haven for birds and brings decorate the hazel strong colour to the garden in winter
It has a deeply scored, dark grey bark and produces the common catkins in spring.
Garrya elliptica 'James Roof' - with its beautiful grey-blue foliage and catkins - is also a shrub that can be grown against a wall.
The population of fox squirrels at RSABG may not need to utilize fungi since the garden contains a variety of food items such as fruits and catkins to consume instead.
Eye-catching black willow, Salix gracilistyla 'Melanostachys', bears dark catkins with red anthers along vivid mahogany branches.
THERE are all sorts of signs to show that the seasons are changing if Mother Nature is an accurate barometer; as snowdrops, hazel catkins and even ladybirds and butterflies have been recorded across the UK on the Woodland Trust's Nature's Calendar website.
Black Bears (Ursus americanus) in southeastern Alaska forage intensively on seed pods and male and female catkins of Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), often breaking many branches from the trees.