Cato


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Related to Cato: Cato the Elder, Cato the Younger

Ca·to 1

 (kā′tō), Marcus Porcius Known as "the Elder" or "the Censor." 234-149 bc.
Roman politician and general who wrote the first history of Rome. As censor he attempted to restore simplicity to Roman life.

Ca·to 2

 (kā′tō), Marcus Porcius Known as "the Younger." 95-46 bc.
Roman politician and great-grandson of Cato the Elder. A conservative opponent of Julius Caesar's political ambitions, he supported Pompey against Caesar in the civil war and committed suicide after Caesar's decisive victory at Thapsus.

Cato

(ˈkeɪtəʊ)
n
1. (Biography) Marcus Porcius (ˈmɑːkəsˈpɔːʃɪəs), known as Cato the Elder or the Censor. 234–149 bc, Roman statesman and writer, noted for his relentless opposition to Carthage
2. (Biography) his great-grandson, Marcus Porcius, known as Cato the Younger or Uticensis. 95–46 bc, Roman statesman, general, and Stoic philosopher; opponent of Catiline and Caesar

Ca•to

(ˈkeɪ toʊ)

n.
1. Marcus Porcius, ( “the Elder” or “the Censor” ), 234–149 B.C., Roman statesman, soldier, and writer.
2. his great-grandson, Marcus Porcius ( “the Younger” ), 95–46 B.C., Roman statesman, soldier, and Stoic philosopher.
Translations

Cato

[ˈkeɪtəʊ] NCatón

Cato

[ˈkeɪtəʊ] nCatone m
References in classic literature ?
With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.
Micawber, in the words of Cato, "Plato, thou reasonest well.
I had the honour to have much conversation with Brutus; and was told, "that his ancestor Junius, Socrates, Epaminondas, Cato the younger, Sir Thomas More, and himself were perpetually together:" a sextumvirate, to which all the ages of the world cannot add a seventh.
What was, was; and may the good that is to come be for all, and the evil for him who goes to look for it -your worship must know that the beginning the old folk used to put to their tales was not just as each one pleased; it was a maxim of Cato Zonzorino the Roman, that says 'the evil for him that goes to look for it,' and it comes as pat to the purpose now as ring to finger, to show that your worship should keep quiet and not go looking for evil in any quarter, and that we should go back by some other road, since nobody forces us to follow this in which so many terrors affright us.
For so Livy (after he had described Cato Major in these words, In illo viro tantum robur corporis et animi fuit, ut quocunque loco natus esset, fortunam sibi facturus videretur) falleth upon that, that he had versatile ingenium.
He carries it so that he may never be captured, like Cato.
Cato was a great Roman who rebelled against the authority of Caesar and in the end killed himself.
But although Cato is not really great, the writer was perhaps the most popular man of his day, and so his tragedy was a tremendous success.
It would seem that I made it according to the recipe which Marcus Porcius Cato gave about two centuries before Christ.
A touch and a glance showed him that there was a small box of pills at Valentin's elbow, and that Valentin was dead in his chair; and on the blind face of the suicide was more than the pride of Cato.
He could, indeed, whenever he laid himself down to rest, say with Cato in the tragical poem--
It had been so used when George III was king; and a picture of the Marquis of Gaunt is still extant, with his hair in powder and a pink ribbon, in a Roman shape, as it was called, enacting the part of Cato in Mr.