Catonian


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Ca`to´ni`an


a.1.Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the stern old Roman, Cato the Censor; severe; inflexible.
References in classic literature ?
All worthy Sancho's observations," said the duchess, "are Catonian sentences, or at any rate out of the very heart of Michael Verino himself, who florentibus occidit annis.
6) Catonian works such as the Praecepta ad filium, or the Carmen de moribus, are all didactic and moralising, but lack the flavour of satire (even by ancient standards--indeed, they explicitly avoid revelling in res ridiculae pudendaque).
Overall, then, Whiggery, imperialism, oligarchy and Catonian republicanism went together, opposed to Toryism, anti-imperialism, agrarian reform and anti-Romanism.
Petrone (1977, 20-4) explicitly defines this morality as Catonian, while Arnott and Owens define this morality more temporally, that is, apropos to 200 B.
1) Here, A and B add: "For if it is of Catonian times, how can there be mention made in the same work of Virgil, Ovid, and Lucan, who lived on this side of the times of the Catos [i.
lt;<Nihilistic Cosmology and Catonian Ethics in Lucan's Bellum Ciuile>>, AJPh 120, 1999, 281-96.
24) The quintessentially Catonian pursuit of agriculture, we may
Thus, while Gellius exactly reproduces certain features of the style of Plato and Philip, he does so in a Catonian mode.