Catullus

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Ca·tul·lus

 (kə-tŭl′əs), Gaius Valerius 84?-54? bc.
Roman lyric poet known for his love poems to an aristocratic woman he named "Lesbia," but whose true identity he hid.

Catullus

(kəˈtʌləs)
n
(Biography) Gaius Valerius (ˈɡaɪəs vəˈlɪərɪəs). ?84–?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
Catullan adj

Ca•tul•lus

(kəˈtʌl əs)

n.
Gaius Valerius, 84?–54? B.C., Roman poet.
Ca•tul′li•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Catullus - Roman lyric poet remembered for his love poems to an aristocratic Roman woman (84-54 BC)Catullus - Roman lyric poet remembered for his love poems to an aristocratic Roman woman (84-54 BC)
Translations

Catullus

[kəˈtʌləs] NCatulo

Catullus

[kəˈtʌləs] nCatullo
References in periodicals archive ?
Exploring Catullan verse through music composition.
For example, in the narrativising Catullan work of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, it was a trend to leave out (or pay minimal attention to) the so-called 'long poems' (61, 62, 63, 64, 66 and 67).
This line is a clear imitation of the opening of the Catullan corpus, "Cui, dono lepidum nouum libellum .
1) Having removed her shirt halfway through the Catullan verses she quotes, and presently clad only in her push-up bra and trousers, Anne launches herself at the protesting Bill, at which point Maggie Harman arrives, looking completely shocked at the scene which greets her.
5) However, it is poem 3 of the Catullan corpus, a dirge on Lesbia's dead pet, which features more prominently in the mind of Naude.
horam (mid hour, 1); pars adaperta fuit, pars altera clausa fenestrae (one shutter of my window was open, the other was closed, 3); aut ubi nox abiit nec tamen orta dies (or when the night has gone and the day is not yet sprung, 6); this never fully allows us to work out whether Corinna is a Catullan goddess or a flesh-and-blood puella.
Dettmer, 'Design in the Catullan corpus: a preliminary study', CW 81 (1988) 371-81 and P.
147-48); Ellen Greene, 'The Catullan Ego: Fragmentation and the Erotic Self,' American Journal of Philology, 116 (1995), 77-93 (p.
Press, 2006), 50-55, studies its Catullan parallels.
Julia Haig Gaisser has described in detail the extent to which the Renaissance Catullus was the product, first, of Martial's emphasis on Catullan eroticism, or rather on a more explicit reading of that eroticism, by which Lesbia's sparrow came to be taken as equivalent to the poet's desire, or in fact the poet's penis itself as the embodiment of that desire.
Thus, John Saltmarsh in a prefatory poem to his collection forsakes the Catullan practices of praising Lesbia's cheeks, eyes and hair, to fly with a more innocent feather ["Sed penna calamus iam candidore volavit"] (sig.
It is linked as well with the kind of formal elegance (not a particularly Zukofskian word, but a very Catullan one) we call concision or economy, a (Poundian) principle this same early essay was already connecting with the signifying force of words and the letters that make them up: