Catullus

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Ca·tul·lus

 (kə-tŭl′əs), Gaius Valerius 84?-54? bc.
Roman lyric poet known for his love poems to an aristocratic woman he named "Lesbia," but whose true identity he hid.

Catullus

(kəˈtʌləs)
n
(Biography) Gaius Valerius (ˈɡaɪəs vəˈlɪərɪəs). ?84–?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
Catullan adj

Ca•tul•lus

(kəˈtʌl əs)

n.
Gaius Valerius, 84?–54? B.C., Roman poet.
Ca•tul′li•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Catullus - Roman lyric poet remembered for his love poems to an aristocratic Roman woman (84-54 BC)Catullus - Roman lyric poet remembered for his love poems to an aristocratic Roman woman (84-54 BC)
Translations

Catullus

[kəˈtʌləs] NCatulo

Catullus

[kəˈtʌləs] nCatullo
References in periodicals archive ?
The poem ends with a direct address of the goddess by the Catullan speaker, requesting her to overlook him when searching for candidates to drive mad.
/passer mortuus est meae puellae (1-3), although many have doubted the sincerity and seriousness of the Catullan dirge, given its Hellenistic predecessors.
Exploring Catullan verse through music composition.
For example, in the narrativising Catullan work of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, it was a trend to leave out (or pay minimal attention to) the so-called 'long poems' (61, 62, 63, 64, 66 and 67).
[What little book, O reader, do we now give to you?] This line is a clear imitation of the opening of the Catullan corpus, "Cui, dono lepidum nouum libellum ...
(5) However, it is poem 3 of the Catullan corpus, a dirge on Lesbia's dead pet, which features more prominently in the mind of Naude.
147-48); Ellen Greene, 'The Catullan Ego: Fragmentation and the Erotic Self,' American Journal of Philology, 116 (1995), 77-93 (p.
Dettmer, 'Design in the Catullan corpus: a preliminary study', CW 81 (1988) 371-81 and P.Y.
Press, 2006), 50-55, studies its Catullan parallels.
Julia Haig Gaisser has described in detail the extent to which the Renaissance Catullus was the product, first, of Martial's emphasis on Catullan eroticism, or rather on a more explicit reading of that eroticism, by which Lesbia's sparrow came to be taken as equivalent to the poet's desire, or in fact the poet's penis itself as the embodiment of that desire.
Thus, John Saltmarsh in a prefatory poem to his collection forsakes the Catullan practices of praising Lesbia's cheeks, eyes and hair, to fly with a more innocent feather ["Sed penna calamus iam candidore volavit"] (sig.
What Zukofsky means by sincerity is thus intimately linked with the kind of attention to detail our language still calls "loving." It is linked as well with the kind of formal elegance (not a particularly Zukofskian word, but a very Catullan one) we call concision or economy, a (Poundian) principle this same early essay was already connecting with the signifying force of words and the letters that make them up: The economy of presentation in writing is a reassertion of faith that the combined letters--the words--are absolute symbols for objects, states, acts, interrelations, thoughts about them.