cauda

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cauda

(ˈkɔːdə)
n
1. (Zoology) zoology the area behind the anus of an animal; tail
2. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. any tail-like structure
b. the posterior part of an organ
[Latin: tail]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cauda - any taillike structure
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
References in periodicals archive ?
22, 2014, the plaintiff was taken back to the operating room for a bilateral laminectomy at L4, with a pre-operative diagnosis of stenosis L4 with partial cauda equina syndrome.
She had no neurological deficit and there were no findings for cauda equina syndrome.
There were no signs or symptoms of cauda equina syndrome.
Imaging may be considered earlier if there is a history of malignancy, concern for infection, a fracture, symptoms of true myelopathy (progressive or severe neurologic deficits), in the setting of cauda equina syndrome (urinary retention, fecal incontinence, motor deficit at multiple levels, and saddle anesthesia), or with history of back surgery.
Approximately 10-12 medical evacuations off-island take place each year for spinal emergencies cord compression, severe spinal stenosis and cauda equina syndrome.
Ms Tait said: "ere seems to be a lack of knowledge even now in the NHS about my condition, cauda equina syndrome, not just in Cheltenham General, but in a lot of the hospitals where I have received treatment since.
70% of the cases reach to full functional capacity within 4-6 weeks thanks to the conservative treatment, the treatment for those with progressive neurologic deficit and cauda equina syndrome who resist to conservative treatment and whose diagnosis is also proved radiologically is surgery [8, 27].
From the neurological standpoint there may be transient motor weakness, cauda equina syndrome (very few cases reported) with symptoms usually resolving within hours or days; there may also be direct neurological damage.
In terms of the neurological status one case had radicular symptoms two presented with incomplete cauda equina syndrome and the other two were normal.
The grandmother-of-one, from Southport, now hopes to raise awareness of Cauda Equina Syndrome, which she says is all too often left undiagnosed.