cauda

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cauda

(ˈkɔːdə)
n
1. (Zoology) zoology the area behind the anus of an animal; tail
2. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. any tail-like structure
b. the posterior part of an organ
[Latin: tail]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cauda - any taillike structure
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
References in periodicals archive ?
If the indications are cauda equina syndrome and progressive neurologic deficit, the final option is surgical in lumbar disc hernias [2, 3].
CAMPAIGNER: Belinda Johnson wants to raise awareness of Cauda Equina Syndrome
Cauda equina syndrome is caused by lumbar disc protrusion, and 1-15% of patients present with abnormal bladder function secondary to impingement of sacral nerve roots.
Tatter SB, Cosgrove GR Hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst causing an acute cauda equina syndrome, J Neurosurg 1994; 81:449-452
For patients with cauda equina syndrome, the ACR report recommends MRI without contrast, with an estimated cost of $1,642 based on data from a large nonprofit health care system.
Medical realities of cauda equina syndrome secondary to lumbar disc herniation.
Cauda equina syndrome in patients with low lumbar fractures.
The primary risk associated with an adverse event in the lumbar spine has been reported to be cauda equina syndrome (approximately I in 6 million manipulations).
Spinal hematoma, cauda equina syndrome, bacterial meningitis, and epidural abscess appear to be the most common severe neurologic complications, based on a study of 1,260,000 spinal blocks and 450,000 epidural blocks administered in Sweden between 1990 and 1999, said David C.
Cauda equina syndrome is caused by any large space-occupying mass, such as a large central HNP, located in the spinal canal at the level of the cauda equina.
The patient continued to have pain and progressed to have a cauda equina syndrome with bilateral lower extremity weakness, loss of bladder control, and absent leg reflexes.