determinism

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de·ter·min·ism

 (dĭ-tûr′mə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The philosophical doctrine that every state of affairs, including every human event, act, and decision, is the inevitable consequence of antecedent states of affairs.

de·ter′min·ist n.
de·ter′min·is′tic adj.
de·ter′min·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

determinism

(dɪˈtɜːmɪˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) Also called: necessitarianism the philosophical doctrine that all events including human actions and choices are fully determined by preceding events and states of affairs, and so that freedom of choice is illusory. Compare free will1b
2. (Philosophy) the scientific doctrine that all occurrences in nature take place in accordance with natural laws
3. (General Physics) the principle in classical mechanics that the values of dynamic variables of a system, and of the forces acting on the system at a given time, completely determine the values of the variables at any later time
deˈterminist n, adj
deˌterminˈistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•ter•min•ism

(dɪˈtɜr məˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. a doctrine that all facts and events exemplify natural laws.
2. a doctrine that all events have sufficient causes.
[1840–50]
de•ter′min•ist, n., adj.
de•ter`min•is′tic, adj.
de•ter`min•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

determinism

1. the doctrine that all f acts and events result from the operation of natural laws.
2. the doctrine that all events, including human choices and decisions, are necessarily determined by motives, which are regarded as external forces acting on the will. Also called predeterminism. Cf. fatalism.determinist, n.deterministic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

determinism

The theory that all events are caused, and that there is no free will.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.determinism - (philosophy) a philosophical theory holding that all events are inevitable consequences of antecedent sufficient causes; often understood as denying the possibility of free will
fatalism - a philosophical doctrine holding that all events are predetermined in advance for all time and human beings are powerless to change them
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
determinismus
determinismi
determinizam
determinizm

determinism

[dɪˈtɜːmɪnɪzəm] Ndeterminismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

determinism

[dɪˈtɜːrmɪnɪzəm] ndéterminisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

determinism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

determinism

[dɪˈtɜːmɪˌnɪzəm] ndeterminismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

de·ter·mi·nism

n. determinismo, teoría que establece que todo fenómeno influido físico o psíquico está predeterminado y no es influido por la voluntad individual.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The hallowed principles of classical Newtonian physics, namely, strong objectivity, causal determinism, locality, materialism, and epiphenomenalism, do not apply at all at the quantum level.
In light of the fact that "even in the most demanding natural sciences there is no compelling evidence for strict causal determinism," the author takes the opportunity to explore the alternative, namely, the presence of "small contingencies." Burbridge puts forth the following thesis: "By adopting the hypothesis that contingencies are possible, we have explored the structure of reciprocal causation as well as some implications that follow.
If moral responsibility is compatible with causal determinism, then it should also be compatible with "the thesis that a given agent designed the world at some past time precisely so as to make it causally inevitable that one performs the particular bad actions one performs" (2).
As per the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on causal determinism, "Physics, particularly twentieth-century physics, does have one lesson to impart to the free will debate: a lesson about the relationship between time and determinism." Newtonian time, the time of our everyday experience, has been superseded, but no universally accepted model seems to have emerged so far.
He begins with chapters on the basics (moral responsibility, choices and actions, causal determinism), the compatibility question, revisionist accounts, and free will skepticism.
The Compatibilist philosophers contend that our freedom of action is compatible with causal determinism whenever we are conscious of having acted as wanted.
This kind of skepticism typically focuses on the alleged incompatibility of free will with causal determinism or with the chanciness (again, allegedly) entailed by indeterminism: because free will is incompatible with whatever causal story turns out to be true, we lack moral responsibility.
since subjective methods do not assume causal determinism, they are the only probabilistic methods that are compatible with an indeterministic worldview.
(1) Morriston holds that Sartre rejects any forms of causal determinism: a belief in psychological determinism is a device we use to hide our absolute freedom from ourselves.
According to Hoefer (2004), causal determinism is "roughly speaking, the idea that every event is necessitated by antecedent events and conditions together with the laws of nature" (Causal determinism section, para.
When this condition is respected, the causal determinism is vindicated without difficulties.
(I) The issue in Stoic compatibilism is not whether Freedom to do Otherwise is compatible with Causal Determinism. (279, 388, 397) But in fact what she establishes, and what her considered view must be, is instead: