causality

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cau·sal·i·ty

 (kô-zăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. cau·sal·i·ties
1. The principle of or relationship between cause and effect.
2. A causal agency, force, or quality.

causality

(kɔːˈzælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the relationship of cause and effect
b. the principle that nothing can happen without being caused
2. causal agency or quality

cau•sal•i•ty

(kɔˈzæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the relation of cause and effect.
2. causal quality or agency.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causality - the relation between causes and effects
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
Translations

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪtɪ] Ncausalidad f

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪti] ncausalité f

causality

nKausalität f

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪtɪ] ncausalità
References in periodicals archive ?
The key challenge that will be addressed is how to deal with cyclic causal relationships (""feedback loops"").
This is to date the most authoritative paper looking at causal relationships between Alzheimers disease and these potentially modifiable factors," Kauwe said.
Other physical causal relationships are unseen, such as gravity causing an apple to fall from a tree.
GNS builds products and models that go beyond correlation to find underlying causal relationships from observational data.
This correlative and descriptive approach, however, is sometimes augmented with more causal relationships between distribution patterns and climatic limitation, based on the possible threat of the on-going climate change.
The third identification strategy employs the method of instrumental variables (IV), a statistical technique used to estimate causal relationships when controlled experiments are not possible.
Serious consideration of causal relationships was often an afterthought.
With the help of searching and matching algorithms, open and axial coding based on causal relationships was performed as suggested by grounded theory.
The study also supported causal relationships between vitamin E and ascorbic acid supplements, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and total fats, alpha-linoleic acid, meat, eggs and milk.
These indicators relate to the three spheres of sustainability-environmental, social, and economic, using SAS' predictive abilities to validate strategies, identify causal relationships, forecast improvement scenarios and drive innovation.
The author asks whether general equilibrium models with information frictions and non-technology shocks can rationalize the observed causal relationships.