casualism

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casualism

(ˈkæʒjʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
the doctrine that the existence and occurrence of everything is controlled by chance
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

casualism

the doctrine that events are ruled by chance.
See also: Chance
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In tandem with Jung's dissatisfaction with the personalism emphasized by Freud was Jung's frustration with the reductive causalism of Freud's view.
Thus Foucault arrives at his concept of the archive, which enables the break with all causalism (causes in the thing itself, the author's intention, etc.).
Among his topics are the law of causality and its methodology, ontological and probabilistic causalisms, Laplacean causalism in quantum physics, the interpretation of important results in quantum physics, causality in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, and micro-physical and cosmic causal continuity.
See Chapter 4 especially, as well as comments in the conclusion, on the shift from moralism towards causalism (337-38).
Crossing successfully is possible only with a willingness to enter an alien land alone, unaccompanied by our familiar accoutrements of causalism, naturalism, moralism, personalism, temporalism, voluntarism, humanism, positivism, literalism.
At any rate, it began to replace the notion of the moral autonomy of people with that of impersonal causation, or what Professor Davies calls "causalism." If people behaved badly, it was not because they decided to do so, but because they were impelled by circumstances beyond their control, such as poverty, overcrowding, or poor drainage.
(123) Accordingly, the methods of modern science involve various forms of empirico-rationalism (i.e., conceptual systemization of the factual, informative input of sensible experience), which, in keeping with horizontal causalism, serves to abstract general patterns from sensible particulars or to reduce holistic experience to sensible parts or quantitative processes seen as somehow causally prior to yet constitutive of that experience.
Non-anglophone authors also may incorrectly "translate" a noun into an apparently English equivalent, perhaps writing, "His work was on the causalism [from French] of infectious diseases" rather than "His work was on the etiology [English medical term] of infectious diseases."
Having drawn these lessons from the critique of voluntarism and causalism, Ripstein proceeds in Chapters Three and Four to construct his own account of corrective justice and risk ownership.
Section 2.1 below presents an account based on Wilson's; section 2.2 elaborates on Wilson's proposal, and in 2.3 and 2.4 it is argued that this account suffices to meet the Davidsonian challenge and provides a plausible alternative to causalism.
Mele disposes of Norman Malcolm's objections to causalism in one page in Chapter 2, and in his last (and shortest) chapter looks, as an admitted afterthought, at the views of Carl Ginet and George Wilson.