Cavalier poets

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Cavalier poets

pl n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) a group of mid-17th-century English lyric poets, mostly courtiers of Charles I. Chief among them were Robert Herrick, Thomas Carew, Sir John Suckling, and Richard Lovelace
2. (Poetry) a group of mid-17th-century English lyric poets, mostly courtiers of Charles I. Chief among them were Robert Herrick, Thomas Carew, Sir John Suckling, and Richard Lovelace
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cav′alier po′ets


n.pl.
a group of English poets, including Herrick, Carew, Lovelace, and Suckling, mainly at the court of Charles I.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cavalier poet Any of a group of English gentlemen poets who were Cavaliers (supporters of Charles I [1625-49] during the English Civil Wars, as opposed to the Roundheads, who supported Parliament).
Herrick was a Cavalier poet, one of the sons of Ben, or poets who followed the tradition of Ben Jonson.
English Cavalier poet, dramatist, and courtier, best known for his lyrics.
In a moving rendition, Richard Lovelace, the famous Cavalier poet, warns that "water'd eyes but swell our Woes," since fate is a bully who "whips us first until we weep" and then continues to whip because he sees us "a-weeping." The only way to defeat him is to take a brave stand: "One gallant thorough-made Resolve / Doth Starry Influence dissolve." In Henry Vaughan's equally fine rendition, we read,
With Professor Ellrodt's gracious permission, we reproduce Eliot's letter, followed by the imitations of John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, John Milton, a Cavalier poet writing in a "metaphysical vein," and Andrew Marvell.
English Cavalier poets urged people to carpe diem, or "seize the day." If computer investigators were to have a mantra, it might be "seize the data." But like seizing the day, the latter may be easier said than done.
Chapter 2 ("Lawes and the Cavalier Poets"), the heart of the book, is packed with pertinent observations on both words and music.
Viewed askance in periods which set store by propriety and good taste, his gift for writing light verse has now and then been hailed as welcome proof that German literature is not an eternal exception and that it, too, was capable of producing a seventeenth-century poet worthy of being set alongside the Italian Marinists or cavalier poets such as Lovelace, his exact contemporary, or Suckling, his closest English counterpart.
Both Spenserian and Cavalier poets appropriated Shakespeare's distinctive treatment of fairylore, ironically aligning it with the courtly myth of the TudorStuart "faery" monarchs.
Like the Cavalier poets countering emptiness with a tortured sophistication, Massinger's accommodations were doomed.