Caves


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cave

 (kāv)
n.
1. A hollow or natural passage under or into the earth, especially one with an opening to the surface.
2. A storage cellar, especially for wine.
v. caved, cav·ing, caves
v.tr.
1. To dig or hollow out.
2. To cause to collapse or fall in. Often used with in: The impact caved in the roof of the car.
v.intr.
1. To fall in; collapse. Often used with in: The walls caved in during the earthquake.
2. To give up all opposition; yield. Often used with in: The school committee caved in to the demands of parents.
3. To explore caves.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cava, from neuter pl. of cavus, hollow; see keuə- in Indo-European roots.]

Caves


the term for speleology used by professionals.
the branch of geology that explores, studies, and describes caves. — speleologist, spelaeologist, n.speleological, spelaeological, adj.
a person who explores caves as a hobby. — spelunk, v.
References in classic literature ?
These were the drinking-places of the Folk that lived in the caves.
"That I should have lived to witness the reality of the fabled Carrion Caves! If these indeed be they, we have found a way beyond the ice-barrier.
The forest ran to the very base of a cliff, in the face of which were the mouths of many caves. They appeared untenanted; but I decided to watch for a while before venturing farther.
For three nights we slept in trees, finding no caves or other places of concealment.
With certain of the people of the Umtetwa he wandered into Swaziland, and sojourned with the Halakazi tribe in their great caves; and the end of it was that he killed the chief of the tribe and took his place.
At the end of the victorious campaign the surviving ape-folk were driven across the plateau (their wailings were horrible) and established in the neighborhood of the Indian caves, where they would, from now onwards, be a servile race under the eyes of their masters.
--Ye long for the worst and dangerousest life, which frighteneth ME most,-- for the life of wild beasts, for forests, caves, steep mountains and labyrinthine gorges.
It was then, for the first time, that I noticed a slight vapor filling the cave. It was extremely tenuous and only noticeable against the opening which led to daylight.
Along this I advanced, and at a sudden turning, a few yards beyond the canyon's end, the path widened, and at my left I saw the opening to a large cave. Before, the ledge continued until it passed from sight about another projecting buttress of the mountain.
Public prayers had been offered up for them, and many and many a private prayer that had the petitioner's whole heart in it; but still no good news came from the cave. The majority of the searchers had given up the quest and gone back to their daily avocations, saying that it was plain the children could never be found.
So the Goat came to the Lion's cave, and stopped there listening for a long time.
Two miles below Hornberg castle is a cave in a low cliff, which the captain of the raft said had once been occupied by a beautiful heiress of Hornberg--the Lady Gertrude-- in the old times.