Cecrops


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Cecrops

(ˈsiːkrɒps)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) (in ancient Greek tradition) the first king of Attica, represented as half-human, half-dragon
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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'It was built thousands of years ago for Athena, the goddess of war, and King Cecrops, the first emperor of Athens, who was said to be an Egyptian god with the head of a man and the body of snake.'
Johann Wolfgang Franck: "O angenehme Nacht" (Die drei Tochter des Cecrops, 1679).
Harrison (1908, 286-9) adduces the examples of the Charites, Semnai, Moirai, and the daughters of Cecrops; she adds, moreover, the useful observation that "The women-trinities rose out of dualities, but not every duality became a trinity....
Within the Pandaridae, representatives of Prosaetes, Cecrops, Luetkenia, Philorthagoriscus, Orthagoriscicola, and Entepherus are considered members of the Dinemoura-group based on their shared possession of a narrow third pedigerous somite and dorsal plates on the fourth pedigerous somite in the adult female and a modified leg 3 terminal endopodal segment in the adult male.
Vastey brings to surface that "Danaus and Cecrops brought agriculture, enlightenment (les lumieres), and the arts of the Egyptians to Greece." (183) Like Firmin, he accentuates the tremendous impact of Egypt in the emergence of Greece and Rome as nations, and insists that both countries "had received these goods/benefits from Egypt," (184) that is the Egyptians brought with them to Greece and Rome "the arts, the commerce, and the navigation system." (185)