Celaeno


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Ce·lae·no

 (sĭ-lē′nō)
n.
1. Greek Mythology One of the Pleiades.
2. One of the six stars in the Pleiades cluster visible to the naked eye.

[Latin Celaenō, from Greek Kelainō.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Celaeno

(sɛˈliːnəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth one of the Pleiades
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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whose stars are these: -- `Lovely Teygata, and dark-faced Electra, and Alcyone, and bright Asterope, and Celaeno, and Maia, and Merope, whom glorious Atlas begot....'
From Alaska, I took the ferry down to Washington state, where I helped an old friend-turned-vintner press the season's grapes (a 14 Viognier from Celaeno Winery).
The first clear representation of death in the novel comes in the form of the harpy Celaeno, whom Mommy Fortuna captures, all the while knowing "[y]our death sits in that cage and hears you" (2:27).
Lately only six members can be seen with the naked eye due to the slight fading from view of one of the sisters, Celaeno. This relatively young star cluster, also named the Pleiades, or Messier 45, is of course home to many more stars which cannot be easily seen with the naked eye [as first noted by Galileo in his 1610 book Sidereus Nuncius (ed)].
The Crimson-collared Grosbeak (Rhodothraupis celaeno) is an uncommon endemic and resident bird of northeastern Mexico, and it is evaluated as Least Concern (IUCN 2007).
EDT, Taygeta 10:00, Celaeno 10:01, Maia 10:23, and Alcyone 10:36.
The stars include, in order of disappearance, Electra (magnitude 3.7), Celaeno (5.5), Taygeta (4.3), Maia (3.9), and the wide double Sterope (5.8 and 6.4).
Inside this narrative are the embedded narratives of ghosts, spirits, and monsters such as Celaeno, leader of the Harpies.
Inside this narrative are the embedded narratives of ghosts, spirits, and monsters--such as Celaeno, leader of the Harpies.
Gorgons, and Hydras and Chimaeras - dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies - may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition-but they were there before.