testimonial

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tes·ti·mo·ni·al

 (tĕs′tə-mō′nē-əl)
n.
1. A statement in support of a particular truth, fact, or claim.
2. A written affirmation of another's character or worth; a personal recommendation.
3. Something given in appreciation of a person's service or achievement; a tribute.
adj.
Relating to or constituting a testimony or testimonial: testimonial statements; a testimonial dinner.

[Middle English, from Old French, of evidence, from Late Latin testimōniālis, of evidence, from Latin testimōnium, testimony; see testimony.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

testimonial

(ˌtɛstɪˈməʊnɪəl)
n
1.
a. a recommendation of the character, ability, etc, of a person or of the quality of a consumer product or service, esp by a person whose opinion is valued
b. (as modifier): testimonial advertising.
2. a formal statement of truth or fact
3. a tribute given for services or achievements
4. (General Sporting Terms) a sports match to raise money for a particular player
adj
of or relating to a testimony or testimonial
Usage: Testimonial is sometimes wrongly used where testimony is meant: his re-election is a testimony (not a testimonial) to his popularity with his constituents
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tes•ti•mo•ni•al

(ˌtɛs təˈmoʊ ni əl)

n.
1. a written declaration certifying to a person's character, conduct, or qualifications, or to the value, excellence, etc., of a thing.
2. something given or done as an expression of esteem, admiration, or gratitude.
adj.
3. pertaining to or serving as a testimonial: a testimonial dinner for the retiring dean.
[1375–1425; < Late Latin testimōniālis. See testimony, -al1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.testimonial - something that serves as evidencetestimonial - something that serves as evidence; "his effort was testimony to his devotion"
evidence - an indication that makes something evident; "his trembling was evidence of his fear"
good authority - testimony by someone who should know; "I have it on good authority"
testament - strong evidence for something; "his easy victory was a testament to his skill"
2.testimonial - something given or done as an expression of esteemtestimonial - something given or done as an expression of esteem
commendation, approval - a message expressing a favorable opinion; "words of approval seldom passed his lips"
3.testimonial - something that recommends (or expresses commendation of) a person or thing as worthy or desirable
congratulations, extolment, kudos, praise - an expression of approval and commendation; "he always appreciated praise for his work"
character reference, reference, character - a formal recommendation by a former employer to a potential future employer describing the person's qualifications and dependability; "requests for character references are all too often answered evasively"
puff - exaggerated praise (as for promotional purposes)
Adj.1.testimonial - expressing admiration or appreciation; "testimonial dinner"
2.testimonial - of or relating to or constituting testimony
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

testimonial

noun reference, recommendation, credential, character, tribute, certificate, endorsement, commendation She couldn't expect him to give testimonials to her ability.
Usage: Testimonial is sometimes wrongly used where testimony is meant: his re-election is a testimony (not a testimonial) to his popularity with his constituents.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

testimonial

noun
2. A statement attesting to personal qualifications, character, and dependability:
3. A formal token of appreciation and admiration for a person's high achievements:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
شَهادَة حُسْن سُلوك
atestposudek
anbefaling
recommandationtémoignage publicitaire
vitnisburîur, meîmæli
bonservisreferanstavsiye mektubu

testimonial

[ˌtestɪˈməʊnɪəl] N
1. (= certificate) → certificado m; (= reference about person) → carta f de recomendación, recomendación f
2. (= gift) → obsequio m
3. (Sport) (also testimonial match) → partido m homenaje
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

testimonial

[ˌtɛstɪˈməʊniəl] n
(British) (= reference) → recommandation f
(= gift) → témoignage m d'estime
(also testimonial match, testimonial game) a player's testimonial → un match en l'honneur d'un joueur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

testimonial

n
(= character recommendation)Referenz f
(= gift)Geschenk ntals Zeichen der Anerkennung or Wertschätzung (geh)
(Sport) → Gedenkspiel nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

testimonial

[ˌtɛstɪˈməʊnɪəl] n
a. (Brit) (reference) → referenze fpl, benservito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

testimony

(ˈtestiməni) plural ˈtestimonies noun
the statement(s) made by a person or people who testify in a law-court; evidence. The jury listened to his testimony.
testiˈmonial (-ˈmouniəl) noun
a (written) statement saying what one knows about a person's character, abilities etc. When applying for a job, one usually needs a testimonial from one's last employer.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter Morrone, head of product development at Capezio, Inc., which has engaged Paloma Herrera for its print ads, said, "There is a value to celebrity endorsement." But, he added, "I'm not sure someone can trademark a name without an end use," such as tights, shoes or dresses.
Summary: New Delhi [India], May 17 (NewsVoir): Clarity Communication, a Delhi-based PR and celebrity endorsement startup that has demonstrated significant growth in adding startups and large companies in last 15 months since its inception raised an undisclosed investment from Atraxn Partners.
Since the introduction of celebrity endorsement, all manner of celebrities have endorsed such things as brands, nonprofit organizations, geographical locations, and even political candidates.
"On the surface, if Jeep were considering a celebrity endorsement, it might think that Rihanna and Beyonce are equally good choices; both are chart-topping female R&B stars with very similar fan bases, "NPD pointed out "However, BrandLink shows that Rihanna's fans are much more likely to choose Jeep."
Celebrity endorsement is always welcome, especially in this case, as Charlotte shows sincere concern for her fellow human beings who have suffered as a result of a heartless uncaring Conservative Government which was supported by only 24.3% of the registered electorate!
Image has always been important to Pringle, who recognised the value of celebrity endorsement as early as the 1950s.
Brands use these mass followings to push their products even more through celebrity endorsement. We saw this last year, with winner Dani Dyer reportedly earning six figures through a deal with Mark Hill hair products.
2 -- Almost all major smartphone brands resort to celebrity endorsement, and OnePlus is no different.
"The results are supported by celebrity endorsement data, which show unhealthy food endorsements increase children's unhealthy food intake, but healthy food endorsements have little or no effect on healthy food intake," said researcher Anna Coate from the University of Liverpool in Britain.
The new University of Liverpool research, published in Pediatrics, shows celebrity endorsement and television advertising of unhealthy foods increases children's intake of these foods.