hydrolysis

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hy·drol·y·sis

 (hī-drŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The reaction of water with another chemical compound to form two or more products, involving ionization of the water molecule and usually splitting the other compound. Examples include the catalytic conversion of starch to glucose, saponification, and the formation of acids or bases from dissolved ions.

hy′dro·lyte′ (-līt′) n.
hy′dro·lyt′ic (-drə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrolysis

(haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Chemistry) a chemical reaction in which a compound reacts with water to produce other compounds
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•drol•y•sis

(haɪˈdrɒl ə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
chemical decomposition in which a compound is split into other compounds by reacting with water.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
The splitting of a chemical compound into two or more new compounds by reacting with water. Hydrolysis plays a role in the breakdown of food in the body, as in the conversion of starch to glucose.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrolysis

The process by which a chemical compound decomposes through reaction with water.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrolysis - a chemical reaction in which water reacts with a compound to produce other compounds; involves the splitting of a bond and the addition of the hydrogen cation and the hydroxide anion from the water
chemical reaction, reaction - (chemistry) a process in which one or more substances are changed into others; "there was a chemical reaction of the lime with the ground water"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hydrolysis

[haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs] Nhidrólisis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hydrolysis

nHydrolyse f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hydrolysis

[haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs] nidrolisi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hy·drol·y·sis

n. hidrólisis, disolución química de un compuesto por acción del agua.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Ruminal cellulolysis is conducted primarily by Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, and Ruminococcus albus [16], and their relative populations can potentially impact the ratios of VFA available to ruminants.
Mycelia growth extension is indicative of the ability to synthesize and produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes involved in cellulolysis, providing the nutritional requirements of these fungi of biotechnological importance (Nwodo-Chinedu, Okochi, Smith, & Omijidi, 2005).
Effects of type and level of supplementation and the influence of the rumen fluid pH on cellulolysis in vivo and dry matter digestion of various roughages.
Tschirner, "Lignocellulose modifications by brown rot fungi and their effects, as pretreatments, on cellulolysis," Bioresource Technology, vol.
On the other hand, cellulolysis and growth by aerobic microbes in nature have similarity with solid state fermentation as compared to liquid media (Holker et al., 2004; Zhu et al., 2009).