Celticism


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Related to Celticism: Celtic culture

Celt·i·cism

 (kĕl′tĭ-sĭz′əm, sĕl′-)
n.
1. A Celtic custom.
2. A Celtic idiom.
3. A fondness for Celtic culture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Celticism

1. a word, phrase, or idiom characteristic of Celtic languages in material written in another language.
2. a Celtic custom or usage.
See also: Language
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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(1883, 12) This association of Celticism with a transcendent and hence an antimaterialist culture, an idea borrowed by Abbey Theatre revivalists and to an extent by Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Renaissance, initiates a self-fulfilling binary.
with the intellectual spine removed." In this reboot of Matthew Arnold's argument about "Celticism," where lovely Celtic sentiment must be married to hard Saxon rationality, Dante's Europe replaces Arnold's England as the place where Irish poetry might find its intellectual backbone and become whole.
(15) Ian Bradley notes that during the Revival period, Irish Catholics 'cold-shouldered the Celtic tradition simply because it had been so effectively and enthusiastically taken over by the rival Church of Ireland.' (16) Nonetheless, in common with Irish Anglican appreciations of Celticism, in Scotland the romantic perception of Celtic Christianity was felt keenly by some of the Glasgow Observer's Catholic poets.
This paper will discuss "The Idiots" in the light of the complex and contradictory discourse of Celticism.
Thus he argues that "Joyce's suspicion of Celticism in Ulysses, like his suspicion of Catholicism, was an amplification of the basic instincts of the middle-class Irish, rather than a lone-voice rejection of the middle-class's conventional wisdom" (90).
However, one factor frustrating a Scots Renaissance was the discursive power of Arnoldian Celticism, an informing principle behind the Celtic Twilight of the late nineteenth, early twentieth century.
Chapter 3 is, more nebulously, on 'Race' and, rather oddly in view of the title, deals with representations of peasant poverty, violence, and insanity, as well as fictional negotiations with the prevailing discourses of Celticism. Chapter 4, 'The New Irish and "the Ould Stock"', deals with literary representations of the upwardly mobile Catholic middle class, portrayed as 'gombeenmen' or political upstarts.
The author's attempt to elide the difference between these texts, produced by different people under vastly different conditions, is disturbing because it implies a transhistorical, essentialist 'Celticism' with its roots in the work of Matthew Arnold and Ernest Renan and not, despite Stalmaszczyk's claims, in any of the texts to which he applies the totalising adjective that forms the first half of his title.
the Celts." Don't be fooled by the seemingly worldwide interest in such attractions as Celtic music and dance: This "new-baked Celticism" is "a marketing device" that signifies nothing so much as "the community's death rattle."
But in New Zealand, the figure of the Maori was also inflected by associated theories of Celticism by Mathew Arnold, Ernest Renan, and the writers of the Celtic Twilight.