cemetery

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cem·e·ter·y

 (sĕm′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
n. pl. cem·e·ter·ies
A place for burying the dead; a graveyard.

[Middle English cimiterie, from Old French cimitiere, from Medieval Latin cimitērium, from Late Latin coemētērium, from Greek koimētērion, from koimān, to put to sleep; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]

cemetery

(ˈsɛmɪtrɪ)
n, pl -teries
a place where the dead are buried, esp one not attached to a church
[C14: from Late Latin coemētērium, from Greek koimētērion room for sleeping, from koiman to put to sleep]

cem•e•ter•y

(ˈsɛm ɪˌtɛr i)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
a burial ground for the dead.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin coemētērium < Greek koimētḗrion a sleeping place <koimân to put to sleep]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cemetery - a tract of land used for burialscemetery - a tract of land used for burials  
potter's field - a cemetery for unknown or indigent people
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"

cemetery

noun graveyard, churchyard, burial ground, necropolis, God's acre There was a small cemetery just outside the town.
Translations
مَقْبَرَةمَقْبَرَه
hřbitov
kirkegårdbegravelsesplads
hautausmaahautuumaakalmisto
groblje
temető
kirkjugarîur, grafreitur
墓地
묘지
coemeterium
kapinės
kapsēta
pokopališče
kyrkogård
สุสาน
nghĩa trangnghĩa địa

cemetery

[ˈsemɪtrɪ] Ncementerio m

cemetery

[ˈsɛmətəri] ncimetière m

cemetery

nFriedhof m

cemetery

[ˈsɛmɪtrɪ] ncimitero, camposanto

cemetery

(ˈsemətri) , ((American) -teri) plural ˈcemeteries noun
a piece of ground, usually not round a church, where people are buried.

cemetery

مَقْبَرَة hřbitov kirkegård Friedhof νεκροταφείο cementerio hautausmaa cimetière groblje cimitero 墓地 묘지 begraafplaats kirkegård cmentarz cemitério кладбище kyrkogård สุสาน mezarlık nghĩa trang 公墓
References in periodicals archive ?
The Tender describes a requirement for various pathway paving repairs at golf courses and cemetaries.
At the safer cemetaries, gravediggers have resorted to burying two people in the space of one, or opening up old family plots, sweeping up the bones and adding a new body.
Kurzman does make at least one important contribution: by carefully reviewing the statistics from the city's crematoriums and cemetaries,