Centaurus

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Cen·tau·rus

 (sĕn-tôr′əs)
n.
A constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near Vela and Lupus.

[Latin Centaurus, centaur; see centaur.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Centaurus

(sɛnˈtɔːrəs)
n, Latin genitive Centauri (sɛnˈtɔːraɪ)
(Astronomy) a conspicuous extensive constellation in the S hemisphere, close to the Southern Cross, that contains two first magnitude stars, Alpha Centauri and Beta Centauri, and the globular cluster Omega Centauri. Also called: The Centaur
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cen•tau•rus

(sɛnˈtɔr əs)

n. gen. -tau•ri (-ˈtɔr aɪ)
the Centaur, a southern constellation containing Alpha Centauri and Beta Centauri.
[< Latin; see centaur]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cen·tau·rus

(sĕn-tôr′əs)
A constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near the Southern Cross and Libra. It contains Alpha Centauri, the star nearest Earth.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Centaurus - a conspicuous constellation in the southern hemisphere near the Southern Cross
Alpha Centauri, Rigil, Rigil Kent - brightest star in Centaurus; second nearest star to the sun
Beta Centauri - the second brightest star in Centaurus
Omega Centauri - a global cluster in the constellation Centaurus
Proxima, Proxima Centauri - the nearest star to the sun; distance: 4.3 light years
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
First discovered in 1915, the Alpha Centauri System is part of the Centaurus constellation and is so close to one another that its two stars, Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B, can actually be seen in the night sky.
According to a report by ABC News, the map of Centaurus A, a galaxy in the Centaurus constellation, covers a segment of sky 200 times the area of the full moon.
In the middle of the Centaurus constellation, star gazers have just spotted a star with more twinkle than most.