planned economy

(redirected from Centrally planned economies)
Related to Centrally planned economies: command economy

planned economy

n
(Economics) another name for command economy
Translations

planned economy

[ˌplændɪˈkɒnəmɪ] neconomia pianificata
References in periodicals archive ?
In many ways, the region is an incredible success story, having transformed successfully from centrally planned economies to market-based systems in less than a generation.
Some of the methods described include a classroom federal funds market experiment, using literature to teach the economics of centrally planned economies, and economics in the film The Third Man.
While it is true that wealth is more equally distributed in centrally planned economies like North Korea, it is true because state planning destroys productivity and incentives.
Political and economic transformation during the past several decades has resulted in formerly centrally planned economies becoming more or less free market in nature, in some cases, now allowing private ownership of property, companies and resources.
To be sure, the world today offers very few examples of genuine centrally planned economies.
In the two decades and more since the fall of the Berlin Wall the former centrally planned economies have taken somewhat different paths to becoming free market economies.
MILAN: In the 66 years since World War II ended, virtually all centrally planned economies have disappeared, largely as a result of inefficiency and low growth.
The year 2004 was the time when world wages, costs, and prices were dampened by the influx into free markets of low-cost highly-educated workers that were on the move from the freed centrally planned economies in the wake of economic reset that followed after the end of the cold war and the fall of the Berlin wall.
Gozkomstat's dedication to the Material Product System, she contends, was supported by a conditional norm that it was more appropriate for centrally planned economies, and as that condition changed so to did the estimation of the statisticians of Gozkomstat concerning the value of the System of National Accounts.
The formerly centrally planned economies may be especially prone to such an outcome due to their inexperience with policymaking in market-based economies and the absence of strong economic institutions, but the malleability of institutions can also be an advantage as adverse institutional consequences of initial decisions can be corrected.
tariffs on imports from centrally planned economies to promote the rights of Jews and other religious minorities to emigrate freely.

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