churl

(redirected from Ceorle)
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Related to Ceorle: Cajun

churl

 (chûrl)
n.
1. A rude, boorish person. See Synonyms at boor.
2. A miserly person.
3.
a. A ceorl.
b. A medieval English peasant.

[Middle English, from Old English ceorl, peasant.]
Word History: The Old English word ceorl (in which the c was pronounced (ch) as in modern English churl) designated a freeman of the lowest class—one who had a social position above a slave but below a thane. Ceorl comes from Germanic *karilaz, whose basic meaning is "old man." In Finnish, which is not a Germanic language, the Germanic word was borrowed and survives almost unchanged as karilas, "old man." The Old Norse descendant of the Germanic word, karl, means "old man, servant," and the Old High German equivalent, karal, meaning "man, lover, husband," has become the name Karl. The Germanic word also entered Old French as Charles, from which we have the name Charles. The Medieval Latin form Carolus is based on the Old High German karal. The fame of Carolus Magnus, "Charles the Great," or Charlemagne, added luster to the name Carolus, and the Slavic languages later borrowed the name as their general word for "king," korol' in Russian—and so, despite the gulf between a king and a churl, the Russsian korol and the Old English ceorl are related.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

churl

(tʃɜːl)
n
1. a surly ill-bred person
2. (Historical Terms) archaic a farm labourer
3. (Historical Terms) a variant spelling of ceorl
[Old English ceorl; related to Old Norse karl, Middle Low German kerle, Greek gerōn old man]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

churl

(tʃɜrl)

n.
1. a rude, boorish, or surly person.
2. a peasant; rustic.
3. a niggard; miser.
4. ceorl.
[before 900; Middle English cherl, Old English ceorl man, freeman; c. Old Frisian tzerl, tzirl, Middle Low German kerle; akin to carl]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.churl - a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinementchurl - a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
2.churl - a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spendchurl - a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend
hoarder - a person who accumulates things and hides them away for future use
pinchgut - a niggardly person who starves himself (and others)
3.churl - a bad-tempered personchurl - a bad-tempered person    
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
crabby person, crab - a quarrelsome grouch
hothead, fire-eater - a belligerent grouch
misanthrope, misanthropist - someone who dislikes people in general
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

churl

noun
An unrefined, rude person:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

churl

[tʃɜːl] N (= person) → patán m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

churl

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Robinson explain the action here in their Guide to Old English (231-32), a viking, his weapon raised, advances, and Byrhtnoth, referred to as an "an-r.d eorl" (132a, resolute earl) goes toward the "ceorle" (132b, peasant or free man of the lowest rank).
The vernacular version in the Pseudo-Egbert Confessional (or Old English Confessional) is even more decisive, adding the word "ever": Ceorle ne gedafenad paet he his wif cefre nacode geseo ("It is not fitting that a man should ever see his wife naked"; Das altenglische bussbuch, ed.