pottery

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pot·ter·y

 (pŏt′ə-rē)
n. pl. pot·ter·ies
1. Ware, such as vases, pots, bowls, or plates, shaped from moist clay and hardened by heat.
2. The craft or occupation of a potter.
3. The place where a potter works.

[French poterie, from Old French, from potier, potter, from pot, pot; see potiche.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pottery

(ˈpɒtərɪ)
n, pl -teries
1. (Ceramics) articles, vessels, etc, made from earthenware and dried and baked in a kiln
2. (Ceramics) a place where such articles are made
3. (Ceramics) the craft or business of making such articles
[C15: from Old French poterie, from potier potter, from pot pot1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pot•ter•y

(ˈpɒt ə ri)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
1. ceramic ware, esp. earthenware and stoneware.
2. the art or business of a potter; ceramics.
3. a place where earthen pots or vessels are made.
[1475–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pottery

  • craze - First a crack or flaw; to craze is to produce minute cracks on the surface of pottery.
  • fictile - An adjective meaning "pertaining to pottery" or "suitable for making pottery."
  • ceramic, earthenware - Pottery made from clay is called ceramic or earthenware.
  • slip - As in pottery, it derives from Norwegian slip/slipa, "slime on fish."
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pottery

See also skill and craft.

1. the art and technology of making objects of clay and other materials treated by firing.
2. articles of earthenware, porcelain, etc. — ceramist, keramist, ceramicist, keramicist, n.
an historical or descriptive work on pottery.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pottery

Strictly, all baked-clay ware except stoneware and porcelain. More generally, the art of shaping and molding all clays while soft and malleable and firing them in a kiln to render the created shapes firm and stable. Firing drives off the water combined with the constituent materials within clay and binds them together. Glazes are often added to make the ware waterproof.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pottery - ceramic ware made from clay and baked in a kilnpottery - ceramic ware made from clay and baked in a kiln
agateware - pottery that is veined and mottled to resemble agate
ceramic ware - utensils made from ceramic material
lusterware - pottery with a metallic sheen produced by adding metallic oxides to the glaze
Wedgwood - a type of pottery made by Josiah Wedgwood and his successors; typically has a classical decoration in white on a blue background
clay - a very fine-grained soil that is plastic when moist but hard when fired
2.pottery - the craft of making earthenware
craft, trade - the skilled practice of a practical occupation; "he learned his trade as an apprentice"
3.pottery - a workshop where clayware is made
workshop, shop - small workplace where handcrafts or manufacturing are done
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pottery

noun ceramics, terracotta, crockery, earthenware, stoneware a 17th century piece of pottery
Related words
adjective fictile
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
صِناعَة الفُخّارفُخّارفُخَّارمَصْنَع الفُخّار
hrnčířstvíkeramikahrnčířská dílna
keramikkeramikkunstkeramikværkstedpottemageripottemagervarer
keramiikka
grnčarstvo
agyagárufazekasmesterségfazekasmûhelyfazekasság
leirkeragerîleirmunir
陶器陶芸窯元
도기
hrnčiarska dielňahrnčiarstvo
lončarstvolončenina
keramikverkstadkeramisk verkstadkrukmakeri
เครื่องปั้นดินเผา
çanak çömlekçömlekçiçömlekçilik
đồ gốm

pottery

[ˈpɒtərɪ] N
1. (= craft) → alfarería f; (= art) → cerámica f
2. (= pots) → cerámica f; [of fine quality] → loza f
a piece of potteryuna cerámica
3. (= workshop) → alfar m, alfarería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pottery

[ˈpɒtəri]
n
(= earthenware objects) → poteries fpl
a piece of pottery → une poterie
(= clay) → terre f
made of pottery → en terre
(= craft, activity) → poterie f
(= factory) → poterie f
modif [industry] → de la poterie; [class, workshop] → de poterie; [bowl] → en terrepotting compost nterreau mpotting shed [ˈpɒtɪŋʃɛd] ncabanon m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pottery

n (= workshop, craft)Töpferei f; (= pots)Töpferwaren pl, → Tonwaren pl; (glazed) → Keramik f; (= archaeological remains)Tonscherben pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pottery

[ˈpɒtərɪ]
1. n (workshop) → fabbrica or laboratorio di ceramiche; (craft) → ceramica; (pots) → ceramiche fpl
a piece of pottery → una ceramica
2. adj (dish, jug) → di ceramica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

potter1

(ˈpotə) noun
a person who makes plates, cups, vases etc out of clay and fires them in an oven (called a kiln).
ˈpottery noun
1. articles made by fired clay. He is learning how to make pottery.
2. (plural ˈpotteries) a place where articles of fired clay are made. He is working in the pottery.
3. the art of making such articles. He is learning pottery.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

pottery

فُخَّار keramika pottemagervarer Töpferwaren κεραμική cerámica keramiikka poterie grnčarstvo ceramiche 陶器 도기 aardewerk keramikk wyroby garncarskie cerâmica керамические изделия krukmakeri เครื่องปั้นดินเผา çanak çömlek đồ gốm 陶器
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Several graduates started their own small enterprises of studio pottery--Vanmala Jain of Kuprkabi, Kavita Pandya Ganguly of Ochre Design & Ochre Beads (figure 8), Puneet Brar of Windglaze (figure 9), Thomas Louis of Banana Pottery (figure 10)--have all popularized ceramicware, which was earlier limited to the elite, and have also generated employment.
The same employees who are out on the floor selling are the ones in charge of buying coffee accessories, Japanese ceramicware or bakeware.
All but two of the bottles were made via a postreduction process called raku, a highly unpredictable method of firing ceramicware in which glaze formation is contingent on temperature shifts within the kiln, resulting in finished surfaces that vary widely, from flat black to reflective metallic.
But we need to look at costs -if we can get government's support on the cost of getting and maintaining the certification, it will be very helpful." Midaya Ceramic is Sri Lanka's oldest ceramicware firm.
Ceramicware has been attracting tourists at the souq which has a workshop to show how potters in days gone by created their masterpieces.
Plates, bowls, and ceramicware by Soule Studio (www.soulestudio.com or 707/829-0146).
The collection also includes glass barware and stemware with sandblasted and engraved designs and terra-cotta based ceramicware that is oven-to-table safe.
The unusual piece of ceramicware features a wild-looking cat entwined around the handle glaring at a mouse on the lid.
They also sell curtains, lampshades and even ceramicware at very reasonable prices.
Other sources of lead exposure include plumbing, ceramicware, traditional remedies, and lead brought into the home from occupational and recreational exposures [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1997].