ceramide

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Related to Ceramides: niacinamide, hyaluronic acid

cer·a·mide

 (sîr′ə-mĭd′, sĕr′-)
n.
Any of a group of lipids that are formed by the linking of a fatty acid to sphingosine, are found in cell membranes, and help to regulate the differentiation, proliferation, and death of cells.

[cer(ebroside), any of various glycolipids containing sphingosine and found especially in brain and nerve tissue (cerebr(o)- + -ose + -ide) + amide.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ceramide

(ˈsɛrəˌmaɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any of a class of biologically important compounds used as moisturizers in skin-care preparations
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Synthetic ceramides are largely utilized for production of the conventional cosmetics and skin care products due to their cost-effectiveness and easy availability.
"Ceramides are the body's natural moisturizer that prevents the skin's dehydration," said Audrey Kunin, a (https://www.allure.com/story/what-are-ceramides) dermatologist based in Kansas City.
Summary: Ceramides (CERs) tend to be instrumental for skin barrier function as research galore has been devoted to detecting number of CERs found in human skin and their function.
Release date- 02082019 - Ceramides (CERs) tend to be instrumental for skin barrier function as research galore has been devoted to detecting number of CERs found in human skin and their function.
To help them take better care of their skin without the trade-offs, CeraVe has launched Hydrating Sunscreen, a mineral sunscreen formulated with broad-spectrum sun protection and three essential ceramides to protect skin in the sun and lock in moisture long after.
Following an extensive longitudinal investigation, conducted by the research team as part of this study, the researchers found that individuals who were overweight or obese had higher levels of blood lipids called ceramides, which placed markers on the DNA of monocytes, making them proliferate.
Quality moisturization is a must for acne patients and has been shown to improve TEWL, normalize ceramides, and repair the microbiome.
In youth, abundant amounts of biologically active moisturizing oils known as ceramides are integrated into the skin's surface layer to maintain skin moisture and a youthful appearance.