cerebral edema

(redirected from Cerebral oedema)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Cerebral oedema: Pulmonary oedema

cerebral edema

Swelling of the brain often resulting from head injury.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cerebral edema - swelling of the brain due to the uptake of water in the neuropile and white matter
dropsy, edema, hydrops, oedema - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavities
References in periodicals archive ?
But Dr Cary said they were unable to say if that was due to a condition called cerebral oedema - which would mean he had survived for an hour or more after the crush.
Which is seemingly abandoned in (the elaborately named) photograph "Altitude Sickness, Frostbite, Chilblains, Arterial Hypertension, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Snow-blindness, Hypothermia, High Altitude Pulmonary Oedema, High Altitude Cerebral Oedema .
If not acclimatised, pilgrims could suffer from highaltitude cerebral oedema, highaltitude pulmonary oedema and other high- altitude sicknesses.
Included in this definition is the cascade of pathophysiological events that lead to progressive worsening of the initial injury, such as intracranial haemorrhage and cerebral oedema.
Sadly, it's a very clear situation and I shall therefore record that Jemma Brownlee has died from cerebral oedema due to ethanol toxicity.
The forensic pathologist told Shawky that the cause of death was a cerebral oedema caused by a blow to the head.
This was followed by water intoxication with dilutional hyponatraemia leading to acute cerebral oedema - brain swelling.
The dangerous mission saw Jeff's guide develop potentially fatal high altitude cerebral oedema, meaning the trip was suddenly called off as the remaining four sat at High Camp, at 5,200m (17,000ft), ready to head to the summit.
Contrast enhanced CT of brain showed diffuse cerebral oedema (Fig.
He said she had died from altitude or mountain sickness, which caused pulmonary and cerebral oedema.
He had been stuck and unable to move at 7,500 metres (24,000 feet) above sea level as bad weather hampered his rescue after he suffered a cerebral oedema.
High doses of intravenous albumin have also been reported to be useful in reducing cytotoxic cerebral oedema in animal models of cerebrovascular occlusion (27,28) and a small clinical study on intracerebral haemorrhage (29).

Full browser ?