Cetshwayo


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Cetshwayo

(Zulu kɛˈtʃwɑːjɒ) or

Cetewayo

n
(Biography) ?1826–84, king of the Zulus (1873–79): defeated the British at Isandhlwana (1879) but was overwhelmed by them at Ulundi (1879); captured, he stated his case in London, and was reinstated as ruler of part of Zululand (1883)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Public servants in Ugu and King Cetshwayo District Municipalities in KwaZulu-Natal will on Friday have an opportunity to engage with Public Service and Administration Deputy Minister Sindisiwe Chikunga as part of the Integrated Government Wide-Public Service Month (IGW-PSM).The visits form part of the month-long celebratory and service delivery focused programme by various government departments that is being rolled out across the country in all three spheres of government from 1 September to 04 October.
Led by King Cetshwayo's impetuous older brother Dabulamanzi, this force disobeyed the Zulu king's orders not to cross into Natal and attack the British at the Swedish mission.
In the 1964 movie Zulu, starring Michael Caine (right), the future South African leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi played his own grandfather, Zulu king Cetshwayo kaMpande.
The supremacy of the Queen Mother, Nqumbazi, over her son, King Cetshwayo, finds expression in Massey's (2007:258) narrative: "When a piece of crewel work bearing the motto, 'God is my King,' was presented to Cetewayo (sic) in London, he at first declined to receive it with the remark, 'There is no one over me but the Queen, my Mother!'" It is significant to learn that the graves of Nqumbazi, the mother of Cetshwayo, the amaZulu king and Mkhabayi's, the sister of Senzangakhona, Shaka's father, were "important as a refuge for those sentenced to execution" (Weir, 2007:11).
Isandlwana itself is a large, rocky hill and at the foot was where the British commander Lord Chelmsford set up camp when he invaded the Zulu lands - without getting government permission - with around 8,000 men to force Zulu king Cetshwayo to join the confederation.
The 1870s saw a resurgence of the Zulus under their King Cetshwayo. The OVS and ZAR, squeezed between the British-ruled Cape Colony to the south and west, Zululand to the east and Matabeleland and Bechuanaland to the north, were constantly fearful of native revolts.
After many wars of national resistance against British colonialism led by African kings, such as Hintsa, Cetshwayo, Moshoeshoe, Sekukuni and Makado, Britain through its guns over the spears of the African people, seized the African country and handed it over to its colonial settlers.
This is the only known hoard of its kind (15)--all other comparable masses of beads are from elite burials at Mapungubwe and Great Zimbabwe, (16) and later from the royal precincts in the capital towns Mgungundlovu (1828-39) and Ondini (1872-79) of the powerful Zulu chiefs Dingane and Cetshwayo (Van der Merwe et al.
The battle came to be remembered as the single greatest defeat for the British army at the hands of a native army; the Zulu king Cetshwayo led the natives in a vicious attack the British would call a slaughter.
For example, the then-premier of KwaZulu-Natal, S'bu Ndebele, delivered a speech on the legacy of the nineteenth-century Zulu leader Cetshwayo in which he eulogised Fanon as a pivotal figure in African resistance to colonialism.