Ch'ien-lung


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Ch'ien-lung: Qianlong

Ch'ien-lung

 (chyĕn′lo͝ong′)

Ch'ien-lung

(tʃɪˈænˈlɒŋ)
n
(Biography) a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for Qian Long
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This double service evidently troubled Ch'ien himself, and he became posthumously notorious for it after the Ch'ien-lung emperor declared him disloyal and treacherous and ordered the complete destruction of all of his works.
Ch'ien-lung dispatched another general to the Hmong regions.
Whereas the Met's exhibition had relied on a specific group of works that had been incorporated by the Ch'ien-lung emperor into a strictly hierarchical canon, the Guggenheim's show was to be curator Sherman Lee's selection of whatever good stuff could be found around the Mainland.
Cheng Hsieh earned a chin-shih degree at the age of forty-four and became known for his painting and calligraphy during a successful official career in Shantung, where he was awarded the title "Envoy of Painting and Calligraphy" (shu-hua shih) during the Ch'ien-lung emperor's visit to Mt.
This book, the author's dissertation submitted to Humboldt University, Berlin, introduces the sixty-eight works included under the category lei-shu [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the Ssu-k'u ch'[ddot{u}]an-shu [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the monumental collection of books commissioned by the Ch'ien-lung [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] emperor (r.
Slight inaccuracies concerning Fang's early career and his involvement in the persecution of Tai Ming-shih do not detract from Guy's perceptive observations, through Fang Pao, about changing relations between emperors and their chief scholar-servitors during the late K'ang-hsi, Yung-cheng, and early Ch'ien-lung periods.
The Literary Inquisition of Ch'ien-lung (1935) resulted from his dissertation, and John Fairbank wrote that it "alone made him the risen star of American China studies, and there was much more to come over the next forty years"(4) (actually over fifty years).
Kent Guy, The Emperor's Four Treasuries: Scholars and the State in the Late Ch'ien-lung Era (Cambridge, Mass.