king snake

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king snake

or king·snake  (kĭng′snāk′)
n.
Any of various nonvenomous constricting New World snakes of the genus Lampropeltis, having a black or brown body with white, yellow, or reddish markings and feeding principally on rodents.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

king snake

or

kingsnake

n
(Animals) any nonvenomous North American colubrid snake of the genus Lampropeltis, feeding on other snakes, small mammals, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

king′ snake`

or king′snake`,


n.
any of several harmless New World snakes of the genus Lampropeltis, that often feed on other snakes.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.king snake - any of numerous nonvenomous North American constrictorsking snake - any of numerous nonvenomous North American constrictors; feed on other snakes and small mammals
colubrid, colubrid snake - mostly harmless temperate-to-tropical terrestrial or arboreal or aquatic snakes
genus Lampropeltis, Lampropeltis - king snakes and milk snakes
common kingsnake, Lampropeltis getulus - widespread in United States except northern regions; black or brown with yellow bands
checkered adder, house snake, Lampropeltis triangulum, milk adder, milk snake - nonvenomous tan and brown king snake with an arrow-shaped occipital spot; southeastern ones have red stripes like coral snakes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The human chain snakes around The Wrekin in May 1981 with Salopians flocking far and wide to the landmark hill