chalybeate

(redirected from Chalybeat)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

cha·lyb·e·ate

 (kə-lĭb′ē-ĭt, -lē′bē-)
adj.
1. Impregnated with or containing salts of iron.
2. Tasting like iron, as water from a mineral spring.
n.
Water or medicine containing iron in solution.

[New Latin chalybeātus, from Latin chalybs, steel, from Greek khalups, khalub-, possibly from Khalups sing. of Khalubes, Chalybes, people of Asia Minor famous for their steel.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chalybeate

(kəˈlɪbɪɪt)
adj
(Chemistry) containing or impregnated with iron salts
n
(Pharmacology) any drug containing or tasting of iron
[C17: from New Latin chalybēātus, ultimately from khalups iron]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cha•lyb•e•ate

(kəˈlɪb i ɪt, -ˌeɪt)

adj.
1. containing or impregnated with salts of iron, as a mineral spring or medicine.
n.
2. a chalybeate water, medicine, or the like.
[1625–35; < New Latin chalybēātus < Latin chalybē(ïus) of iron (< Greek s. chalyb- iron, steel, after the Chálybes people of Asia Minor famous for their steel)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.chalybeate - containing or impregnated with or tasting of iron
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Natural History of the Chalybeat and Purging Waters of England, with their Particular Essays and Uses.
He "took frequent Vomits, and gentle Purges, try'd Volatiles, Foetids, Bitters, Chalybeats, and Mineral Waters, and had the Advice of all [his] Physical Friends, but with little or no sensible Benefit" (328-29).
Volatiles and foetids, active remedies, "which emit the strongest Effluvia," were taken to "divide, break and dissolve the saline, acrid and hard Concretions" of salts; astringent bitters and chalybeates taken to "crisp, wind up and contract the Fibres of the whole System," and mineral waters taken to thin the fluids so that they flowed more easily through the vascular system (The English Malady, pp.