Chamaecyparis


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Noun1.Chamaecyparis - a genus of ChamaecyparisChamaecyparis - a genus of Chamaecyparis    
gymnosperm genus - a genus of gymnosperms
Cupressaceae, cypress family, family Cupressaceae - cypresses and junipers and many cedars
Atlantic white cedar, Chamaecyparis thyoides, coast white cedar, southern white cedar, white cypress, white cedar - slow-growing medium-sized cedar of east coast of the United States; resembles American arborvitae
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, Lawson's cedar, Lawson's cypress, Oregon cedar, Port Orford cedar - large timber tree of western North America with trunk diameter to 12 feet and height to 200 feet
Alaska cedar, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Nootka cypress, yellow cedar, yellow cypress - tall evergreen of the Pacific coast of North America often cultivated for ornament
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chamaecyparis fan-shaped; ovulate cones with scales, bluish purple to reddish brown, aresinous </pre> <p>1.
Researchers at the School of Pharmacy, University of London, studied cones from the Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, known as Lawson's Cypress.
A golden variety, such as Chamaecyparis lawsoniana Lane or Stardust, will lighten up a dark corner.
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Boulevard' (cam-e-sip'-uh-riss pi-sif'-er-uh)
The Fish and Wildlife Service's Albemarle/Pamlico Coastal Program in North Carolina is working with the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge and North Carolina State University to restore an 18,000-acre (7,280-hectare) Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides)/bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) bog.
In upper slope forests and on rocky outcrops at lower elevations western hemlock, western redcedar, and yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) are common.
Comparison of wood properties of Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obsta) small diameter logs collected from different tree ages and heights.
Maybe a dwarf conifer (try Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Ellwood's Gold') or a small bay tree for height and all-year-round interest.
Branches of boulevard chamaecyparis add hues of silvery blue, while stag horn sumac berries are a contrast in rusty red.
This process is important because allows the subsequent development of the embryo, especially in seeds characterised by a morphological dormancy (immature embryo), like Chamaecyparis nootkatensis seeds [56].
Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Fernspray Gold' (H) echoes the greens in the background, while ruby clematis (A) and burgundy 'Crimson Queen' Japanese maple (G) are striking accents.