Zen

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Related to Chan Buddhism: Zen Buddhism

Zen

 (zĕn)
n.
1. A school of Mahayana Buddhism that asserts that enlightenment can be attained through meditation, self-contemplation, and intuition rather than through faith and devotion and that is practiced mainly in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Also called Zen Buddhism.
2. also zen An approach to an activity, skill, or subject that emphasizes simplicity and intuition rather than conventional thinking or fixation on goals: the zen of cooking.

[Japanese zen, from Early Middle Chinese dʑian, meditation; also the source of Mandarin chán), from Pali jhānaṃ, from Sanskrit dhyānam, from dhyāti, he meditates.]
Word History: Zen, a word that evokes the most characteristic and appealing aspects of Japanese culture for many English speakers, is ultimately of Indo-European origin. The Japanese word zen is a borrowing of a medieval Chinese word (now pronounced chán, in modern Mandarin Chinese) meaning "meditation, contemplation." Chán is one of the many Buddhist terms in Chinese that originate in India, the homeland of Buddhism. A monk named Bodhidharma, said to be of Indian origin, introduced Buddhist traditions emphasizing the practice of meditation to China in the 5th century and established Chan Buddhism. From the 7th century onward, elements of Chan Buddhism began to reach Japan, where chán came to be pronounced zen. The Chinese word chán is a shortening of chán'nǎ "meditation, contemplation" a borrowing of the Sanskrit term dhyānam. The Sanskrit word is derived from the Sanskrit root dhyā-, dhī-, "to see, observe," and the Indo-European root behind the Sanskrit is *dheiə-, *dhyā-, "to see, look at." This root also shows up in Greek, where *dhyā- developed into sā-, as in the Common Greek noun *sāma, "sign, distinguishing mark." This noun became sēma in Attic Greek and is the source of English semantic.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Zen

(zɛn) Buddhism
n
1. (Buddhism) a Japanese school, of 12th-century Chinese origin, teaching that contemplation of one's essential nature to the exclusion of all else is the only way of achieving pure enlightenment
2. (Buddhism) (modifier) of or relating to this school: Zen Buddhism.
[from Japanese, from Chinese ch'an religious meditation, from Pali jhāna, from Sanskrit dhyāna]
ˈZenic adj
ˈZenist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Zen

(zɛn)

n.
1. a Mahayana movement of Buddhism, introduced into China in the 6th century a.d. and into Japan in the 12th century, that emphasizes enlightenment by means of meditation and direct, intuitive insights.
2. the discipline and practice of this sect.
[1725–35; < Japanese]
Zen′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Zen - school of Mahayana Buddhism asserting that enlightenment can come through meditation and intuition rather than faith; China and Japan
Buddhism - a religion represented by the many groups (especially in Asia) that profess various forms of the Buddhist doctrine and that venerate Buddha
Zen Buddhist - an adherent of the doctrines of Zen Buddhism
2.Zen - a Buddhist doctrine that enlightenment can be attained through direct intuitive insight
satori - (Zen Buddhism) a state of sudden spiritual enlightenment
Buddhism - the teaching of Buddha that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct and wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth
3.zen - street name for lysergic acid diethylamideZen - street name for lysergic acid diethylamide
LSD, lysergic acid diethylamide - a powerful hallucinogenic drug manufactured from lysergic acid
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
zenzenbuddhalaisuus
thiền

Zen

[zen]
A. NZen m
B. CPD Zen Buddhism Nbudismo m Zen
Zen Buddhist Nbudista mf Zen
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Zen

[ˈzɛn] nzen m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Zen

nZen nt; Zen BuddhismZen-Buddhismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Zen

[zɛn] nZen m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

zen

adj & n zen m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based upon reception aesthetics' emphasis upon the function of readers for meaning production and Bakhtin's model of exotopic intercultural relation, this essay argues that for Chinese readers, Emily Dickinson's works are part of a long meditative tradition, and investigates how her poetics of emptiness is marked by a negative tendency that resonates with Daoism and Chan Buddhism. Chapter Forty-five of Laozi's eponymous text, Laozi, a classic of Daoism, considers clarity and quiescence as the spiritual ideal.
Eichmann also puts herself in dialogue with a range of scholars including those of networks, epistolary and print culture, religious identity, Confucian Studies, Buddhist Studies, religious practice, lived religion, meditation, religious experience, as well as Pure Land and Chan Buddhism. The structure of her book allows for individual chapters to be easily incorporated into graduate or advanced undergraduate courses as one discusses general topics such as religious identity, ethics, and meditation, or more specific issues such as killing and eating animals, releasing-life societies, encounter dialogues, or Pure Land recitation.
"Onto-Epistemology of Sudden Enlightenment in Chan Buddhism." Chung-Hwa Buddhist Journal 13.
Seeing through Zen: Encounter, Transformation, and Genealogy in Chinese Chan Buddhism. Berkeley: University of California Press.
For the student of philosophy, approaching Heidegger's work through Chan Buddhism can be a great advantage.
Burger combines both the head chef's narration and statements of fact about Buddhism in general and Chan Buddhism in particular, with images ranging from the production of food on the temple grounds, the preparation of food in the kitchen (or "Big Hut" as it is called at the monastery), its consumption by the meditating monks, and finally, ritual offerings of food to the buddhas.
They discuss Buddhism in Chinese literature, the Chinese god Nezha and his Indian roots in stories about Nalakubara and Krsna, the role of the god Yama in India, the conceptions of the figure of the Buddha in terms of sex, the Asoka legend in the Wuyue period, how major monasteries in premodern China constructed monastic family lines going back to India, the legends of Bodhidharma for understanding the origin of Chinese Chan Buddhism, nirvana and insentience in Buddhism, and Daoism.
Public Zen, Personal Zen, focusses on the transmission of Chan Buddhism to Japan and chronicles how Japanese Buddhists integrated their own institutions, perspectives, and practices within broader Japanese cultural contexts, but the book is not simply a history of how Chan came to Japan and became Zen.
Jack "A Review of Enlightenment in Dispute: The Reinvention of Chan Buddhism in 17th-century China," Journal of Buddhist Ethics.
The teaching principle of the group is to mix various styles of Kung Fu, Wushu, Chan Buddhism (known as Zen) and Shaolin Kung Fu in a
The partial replacement of Indian meditation with sinicised forms had taken place ever since the meditation manuals of Huisi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and Zhiyi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in 6th-century Tiantai Buddhism, but the emergence of "silent illumination" (Mozhao Chan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) and "keyword meditation" (Kanhua Chan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in eleventh-century Chan Buddhism marks an even more thorough departure from Indian models.