rood screen

(redirected from Chancel screen)
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Related to Chancel screen: Altar screen, rood beam, rood loft

rood screen

n.
In medieval churches, an often openwork wall-like screen separating the choir from the nave and extending upward to the rood beam.

rood screen

n
(Architecture) a partition of stone or wood, often richly carved and decorated, that separates the chancel from the main part of a church: it is surmounted by a crucifix (rood), and was an important feature of medieval churches, though in England many rood screens were destroyed at the Reformation

rood′ screen`


n.
a screen separating the nave from the choir or chancel of a church.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rood screen - a screen in a churchrood screen - a screen in a church; separates the nave from the choir or chancel
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
screen - partition consisting of a decorative frame or panel that serves to divide a space
Translations

rood screen

nLettner m (spec)
References in periodicals archive ?
Located off Huyton Lane inHuyton, the church was listed in 1951 and has early Norman font, a charity board dated 1710 and a 16th century chancel screen removed during the Civil War and later replaced.
The lead archaeologist, Professor Steven Notley of Nyack told Fox News that they found evidence, such as pieces of marble from its chancel screen, small gilded glass blocks called tesserae that were used in ornate church wall mosaics, of the church's existence.
The church of the monastery, which was built in the 16 AD, is divided into two parts; a nave with two aisles and is illuminated by a high eastern window and the second part is the sanctuary, which contains the altar and the apse and is separated from the rest of the church by a stone and wooden chancel screen.
His funeral hatchment hangs in the baptistry, and the pulpit and chancel screen were donated in memory of Lord and Lady Armstrong.
ALL Hallows' folk were delighted that after almost 12 months absence their royal coat of arms dating back to the reign of Charles 1 was put back above the chancel screen in time for their Patronal Festival on November 1.
The sheaf of corn looks lovely at the font and in the Church of my boyhood, we used to drape a fishing net over the chancel screen - even though we were 60 miles from the sea!