Chandrasekhar limit


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Related to Chandrasekhar limit: Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar

Chandrasekhar limit

n
(Astronomy) astronomy the upper limit to the mass of a white dwarf, equal to 1.44 solar masses. A star having a mass above this limit will continue to collapse to form a neutron star
[C20: named after S. Chandrasekhar, who calculated it]
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Chandrasekhar's contributions to our understanding of stars and their evolution: The Chandrasekhar limit," Google explained.
Eventually, they collide and merge and, after exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit, explode as SN Ia.
When white dwarfs accrete too much material, they burst through a strict weight restriction called the Chandrasekhar limit and trigger a thermonuclear blast deep inside themselves, self-annihilating in a Type Ia supernova.
White dwarfs explode when their mass exceeds a threshold called the Chandrasekhar limit, about 1.4 times the mass of the sun.
The key feature of Type Ia SN--which result from the explosion of white dwarf stars that are sucking up material from companion stars--is that they only go off as the white dwarf approaches a critical mass, the Chandrasekhar limit (1.4 times the mass of our Sun).
It was noticed that the Chandrasekhar Limit, which is supposed to dictate how large white dwarfs can get before they explode into supernovae, doesn't always apply, which might lead to problems, because that limit has been the foundation for decades of astrophysical science, including estimates of the size of the universe.
If a white dwarf gains too much mass, it approaches the so-called Chandrasekhar limit, about 1.4 times the mass of our sun, and then something ordinarily impossible happens.
These systems can be formed by a white dwarf and a normal stellar companion that contributes the matter necessary for it to reach a critical mass of 1.4 times the mass of the Sun, the so-called Chandrasekhar limit.
The extra mass tips the white dwarf past the Chandrasekhar limit, the point at which the pressure between electrons deep inside can no longer support the dwarf's weight, causing it to collapse.
The key feature of Type Ia supernovae - which result from the explosion of white dwarf stars that are sucking up material from companion stars - is that they only go off as the white dwarf approaches a critical mass, the Chandrasekhar limit (1.4 times the mass of our Sun).
Most white dwarfs are well below this "Chandrasekhar limit," weighing in around 0.5 to 0.6 solar mass.
Until recently, it was thought that white dwarfs could not exceed what is known as the Chandrasekhar limit, a critical mass equaling about 1.4 times that of the Sun, before exploding in a supernova.