Charadrius


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Noun1.Charadrius - type genus of the Charadriidae: ploversCharadrius - type genus of the Charadriidae: plovers
bird genus - a genus of birds
Charadrius melodus, piping plover - small plover of eastern North America
Charadrius vociferus, kildeer, killdeer, killdeer plover - American plover of inland waters and fields having a distinctive cry
Charadrius morinellus, dotrel, dotterel, Eudromias morinellus - rare plover of upland areas of Eurasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Yasue and Dearden (2006) reported the simultaneous biparental incubation of two nests by a pair of Malaysian Plovers Charadrius peronii.
There are no amenities, but visitors can observe a number of wildlife species, including the piping plover (Charadrius melodus), which is endangered in New York and federally listed as threatened.
2012: Dual function of egg-covering in the Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus.
Charadriiformes: Charadrius alexandrinus "chorlo nevado", se reproduce en la playa arenosa marina y esta presente durante todo el ano, tanto en la zona marina como en el espejo de agua de las lagunas.
The estuary plays a key role as feeding and roosting site for several Nearctic birds (Calidris fuscicollis, Limosa haemastica, Calidris canutus, among others) as well as Patagonian species, such as Charadrius falklandicus, Haematopus leucopodus, and Pluvianellus socialis (Ferrari et al., 2002).
The Boca Chica Tract also supports the highest concentrations of breeding Snowy Plovers, Charadrius alexandrinus, and Wilson's Plovers, Charadrius wilsonia, in the Lower Laguna Madre Region of Texas (Zdravkovic 2005).
Across temperate North America, the widespread and abundant killdeer Charadrius vociferous, a plover that frequents both uplands and wetlands, is perhaps the best known ground nesting species attracted to anthropogenic cover types.
Bala LO (2004) Prey selection and feeding behaviour of Two-banded Plover (Charadrius falklandicus) in Peninsula Valdes.
pied avocet, Recurvirostra avosetta, plovers, Charadrius spp, herons, Ardeidae spp., grebes, Podiceps spp, and the black-winged stilt, Himantopus himantopus), faced the destruction of their habitats in recent years.
We observed during high tide eared grebes (juveniles, adults), snowy egrets (juveniles), brant goose (Branta bernicla, adults), marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa, adults) and snowy plovers (Charadrius alexandrines, adults) foraging in the wetland.
Fish and Wildlife Service, and a cadre of volunteers--has protected and enhanced important nesting habitat for 20 percent of the Pacific coast population of the federally threatened western snowy plover (Charadrius nivosus), while increasing awareness and support for the bird's recovery.