Chariotry


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Chariotry

 warriors who fought from chariots collectively, 1828.
References in periodicals archive ?
In my accession year (and) in my first regnal year when the god Samas, judge of the (four) quarters, spread his beneficial protection over me (and), having nobly ascended the royal throne, he placed in my hand the sceptre for the shepherding of the people, (at that time) I mustered my chariotry (and) troops.
The combined chariotry of the League is reckoned by Shalmaneser at 3,940 vehicles, and these would require close to 8,000 men and 8,000 horses in action, with extra horses kept in reserve lest an equine casualty leave a vehicle and two men useless.
The emphasis on drinking vessels in graves of the Early Mycenaean period combines with the emphasis on weaponry, chariotry, hunting, and glittering items of personal adornment to suggest that the feast was an important bonding mechanism for the kind of active elite warrior band that we can probably see, for instance, in the Mycenae shaft graves--and one might hazard that its importance in this respect was directly commensurate with its exclusivity.
He will take your sons and direct them to his chariotry and cavalry, and they will run in front of his chariot.
He provided himself with chariotry and horses and fifty men to run before him.
In The Great Hymn to Aten, found in the tomb of the commander of the chariotry, we see a reflection of the pharaoh's religious fervor.
Drawing on works of Schulman, Glock, Sasson, Kendell, Heltzer, Beal, and others, and through close examination of Hittite and Egyptian texts and Egyptian commemorative reliefs, Drews argues that the palace - based elite military system of the chariotry was the basic form of warfare in the Bronze Age and that infantries were essentially chariot runners or skirmishers.
The records of palace administration reveal a centralized production and provision of chariots, from which we should probably infer the existence of organized chariotry battalions under central control, rather than independently operating chariot-owners.
Drews shows that chariotry was the dominant arm in eastern Mediterranean armies, although the size of chariot forces was limited by the high cost of equipping and maintaining chariots.
It is divided into three sections, based on the military professions: infantry, cavalry, and chariotry. The third chapter deals with the units of free citizens and chapter four examines the fief system.
Especially given the place name Pi-Ha-hirot/Pi-Hiroti in both scriptural and Egyptian documents revealing the whereabouts of this most unusual drowning, one preceded by an upward sweep, a raising and plunging of a Pharaoh and his chariotry while chasing escapees.