Graces

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grace

 (grās)
n.
1. Seemingly effortless beauty or charm of movement, form, or proportion.
2. A characteristic or quality pleasing for its charm or refinement.
3. A sense of fitness or propriety.
4.
a. A disposition to be generous or helpful; goodwill.
b. Mercy; clemency.
5. A favor rendered by one who need not do so; indulgence.
6. A temporary immunity or exemption; a reprieve.
7. Graces Greek & Roman Mythology Three sister goddesses, known in Greek mythology as Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, who dispense charm and beauty.
8. Christianity
a. Divine favor bestowed freely on people, as in granting redemption from sin.
b. The state of having received such favor.
c. An excellence or power granted by God.
9. A short prayer of blessing or thanksgiving said before or after a meal.
10. Grace Used with His, Her, or Your as a title and form of address for a duke, duchess, or archbishop.
11. Music An appoggiatura, trill, or other musical ornament in the music of 16th and 17th century England.
tr.v. graced, grac·ing, grac·es
1. To honor or favor: You grace our table with your presence.
2. To give beauty, elegance, or charm to.
3. Music To embellish with grace notes.
Idioms:
in the bad graces of
Out of favor with.
in the good graces of
In favor with.
with bad grace
In a grudging manner.
with good grace
In a willing manner.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin grātia, from grātus, pleasing; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Graces

(ˈɡreɪsɪz)
pl n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth three sisters, the goddesses Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, givers of charm and beauty
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Gràcies
Gratiae
References in classic literature ?
907-911) And Eurynome, the daughter of Ocean, beautiful in form, bare him three fair-cheeked Charites (Graces), Aglaea, and Euphrosyne, and lovely Thaleia, from whose eyes as they glanced flowed love that unnerves the limbs: and beautiful is their glance beneath their brows.
At La Charite, I executed the poor fellow's dying wishes.
In a final chapter on "the Impulse to Charity," Diefendorf depicts the creative contributions of five Parisian women to the charitable works of the early seventeenth-century: Marguerite de Silly, who was no mere aristocratic Lady Bountiful permitting Vincent de Paul to carry out his work, but rather an active collaborator in furthering the work of religious instruction of the poor through the Confraternities of Charity (p.207); Louise de Marillac (p.210), who played a active part in creating the Filles de Charite to assist the parish charites; and who in Diefendorf's detailed account, demonstrated the qualities of "imagination, initiative, and considerable administrative talent (p.