Charlemagne


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Char·le·magne

 (shär′lə-mān′) Also called Charles I or "Charles the Great." 742?-814.
King of the Franks (768-814) and founder of the first empire in western Europe after the fall of Rome. His court at Aix-la-Chapelle became the center of the Carolingian Renaissance.

Charlemagne

(ˈʃɑːləˌmeɪn)
n
(Biography) ?742–814 ad, king of the Franks (768–814) and, as Charles I, Holy Roman Emperor (800–814). He conquered the Lombards (774), the Saxons (772–804), and the Avars (791–799). He instituted many judicial and ecclesiastical reforms, and promoted commerce and agriculture throughout his empire, which extended from the Ebro to the Elbe. Under Alcuin his court at Aachen became the centre of a revival of learning

Char•le•magne

(ˈʃɑr ləˌmeɪn)

n.
( “Charles the Great” ) A.D. 742–814, king of the Franks 768–814; as Charles I, first emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 800–814.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Charlemagne - king of the Franks and Holy Roman EmperorCharlemagne - king of the Franks and Holy Roman Emperor; conqueror of the Lombards and Saxons (742-814)
Translations

Charlemagne

[ˈʃɑːləmeɪn] NCarlomagno

Charlemagne

Charlemagne

[ˈʃɑːləˌmeɪn] nCarlo Magno
References in classic literature ?
In the ninth century Charlemagne, its warlike monarch, carried his victorious arms in every direction; and Germany became a part of his vast dominions.
So a great Frankish victory or defeat was gained or avoided; and in order to commemorate the episode, Charlemagne commanded a city to be built there, which he named Frankfort--the ford of the Franks.
From the "Master of Sentences," he had passed to the "Capitularies of Charlemagne;" and he had devoured in succession, in his appetite for science, decretals upon decretals, those of Theodore, Bishop of Hispalus; those of Bouchard, Bishop of Worms; those of Yves, Bishop of Chartres; next the decretal of Gratian, which succeeded the capitularies of Charlemagne; then the collection of Gregory IX.; then the Epistle of
And the song he sang was of Roland, the great champion of Charlemagne. The Roland story is to France what the Arthur story is to us.
She would like the relics of great people better, for I've seen her Napoleon's cocked hat and gray coat, his baby's cradle and his old toothbrush, also Marie Antoinette's little shoe, the ring of Saint Denis, Charlemagne's sword, and many other interesting things.
Here is a crumbling wall that was old when Columbus discovered America; was old when Peter the Hermit roused the knightly men of the Middle Ages to arm for the first Crusade; was old when Charlemagne and his paladins beleaguered enchanted castles and battled with giants and genii in the fabled days of the olden time; was old when Christ and his disciples walked the earth; stood where it stands today when the lips of Memnon were vocal and men bought and sold in the streets of ancient Thebes!
In twenty horses for saddle and draught, which I have particularly at my chateau of Pierrefonds, and which are called - Bayard, Roland, Charlemagne, Pepin, Dunois, La Hire, Ogier, Samson, Milo, Nimrod, Urganda, Armida, Flastrade, Dalilah, Rebecca, Yolande, Finette, Grisette, Lisette, and Musette.
He said this as if he had been Charlemagne, and commanded armies; and indeed, much as I admired his courage, I was always in danger of smiling at his vanity: in danger, I say, for had I not kept my countenance, I would be afraid to think what a quarrel might have followed.
And if truth to life is the main thing the drama should keep in view, how is it possible for any average understanding to be satisfied when the action is supposed to pass in the time of King Pepin or Charlemagne, and the principal personage in it they represent to be the Emperor Heraclius who entered Jerusalem with the cross and won the Holy Sepulchre, like Godfrey of Bouillon, there being years innumerable between the one and the other?
Be this conceit of mine as it may, gentlemen, at all events Steelkilt was a tall and noble animal with a head like a Roman, and a flowing golden beard like the tasseled housings of your last viceroy's snorting charger; and a brain, and a heart, and a soul in him, gentlemen, which had made Steelkilt Charlemagne, had he been born son to Charlemagne's father.
You mean you're the late Charlemagne; you must be six or seven hun- dred years old, at the very least."
The Emperor Charlemagne, in whose reign they were first introduced, seems to have been very sensible of the inconveniences arising from the fashion of this garment.