Charles' law


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Charles' law

(ˈtʃɑːlzɪz)
n
(General Physics) the principle that all gases expand equally for the same rise of temperature if they are held at constant pressure: also that the pressures of all gases increase equally for the same rise of temperature if they are held at constant volume. The law is now known to be only true for ideal gases. Also called: Gay-Lussac's law
[C18: named after Jacques A. C. Charles (1746–1823), French physicist who first formulated it]
References in periodicals archive ?
In a report filed with the Manila Schools Division Office, MSHS principal Eva Nacion said that 60 milliliters of mercury from a Charles' Law apparatus spilled on the corridor of the science laboratory on March 18, which Science teachers immediately cleaned up.
The Gas Laws workshop explores the nature of gases through a plethora of hands-on activities that demonstrate numerous principles, including Boyle's law, Charles' law, the Bernoulli principle and combustion of gases.
For instance, fail to explain that the air inside the flask enclosed by the mercury is a closed system); 1 point for the statements showing partial misconceptions but indicating some degree of relevance toward the target concept (e.g., refer to the test item is related to Boyle's law or Charles' law but fail to explain how the laws can be used in the item); 0 points for no explanation or explanations with irrelevant statements or misconceptions.