Charles Dudley Warner


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Noun1.Charles Dudley Warner - United States filmmaker who with his brothers founded the movie studio that produced the first talking picture (1881-1958)Charles Dudley Warner - United States filmmaker who with his brothers founded the movie studio that produced the first talking picture (1881-1958)
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"Politics makes strange bedfellows." That was 19th-century author/editor Charles Dudley Warner's famous take on the queer alliances that typify the so-called art of statecraft.
It was Charles Dudley Warner, not his friend Mark Twain, who observed that everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.
"Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits." Perhaps the most misattributed Twain "quotation" is "Everybody always talks about the weather, but nobody ever does anything about it." As we all know, that one originated with his friend, neighbor, and collaborator Charles Dudley Warner. I think how sad it is that Warner, who had such a successful career as a writer and editor, said one thing that he should be remembered for--but Mark Twain steals his one potential moment of immortality.
Visitor Charles Dudley Warner, in 1896, found them to be "expert and civil drivers," and their service "prompt and agreeable." If not always fondly, they were almost always remembered by their passengers as an integral part of their visits.
The greed and corruption of that era were satirized in 1873 by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner in their book "The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today." The period ended with the depression of 1893-1896, and was followed by the major political reforms of the Progressive Era.
Charles Dudley Warner, Twain's co-author of The Gilded Age (1874), openly contributed.
According to an old quip (often attributed to Mark Twain but more likely said by his friend, newspaper editor Charles Dudley Warner), "Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it." That was said long before people knew about global warming or climate change.
The authors are Anon., Charles Dudley Warner, Anna Sewell, Thomas Carlyle, Anon., Hans Christian Andersen, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Francis Parkman, Mark Twain, and Charles Dickens.
Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner made this the unmistakable point of the first modern American political novel--and certainly the only one to supply the name of an actual political epoch--The Gilded Age.
"Everyone talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it," wrote 19th century essayist Charles Dudley Warner.
Two years earlier, with the Tilton-Beecher scandal in mind, Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner had attacked on the "emotional power of forensic sentimentality" (Korobkin 82) with their satirical novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today.
"Narrative" and "culture" end up losing their specificity here, as does the more crucial category, "story." Hence in her discussion of Charles Dudley Warner and Mark Twain's The Gilded Age, narrative provides a transparent example of a cultural "fear": "I want to discuss the novel briefly to illustrate a widespread fear among Americans that the juridical use of sentimentality posed a profound threat to justice, law and society" (86).