Charles Goodyear


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Noun1.Charles Goodyear - United States inventor of vulcanized rubber (1800-1860)Charles Goodyear - United States inventor of vulcanized rubber (1800-1860)
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Stephen Moulton, an agent to Charles Goodyear, established the rubber industry in the United Kingdom in 1848 when he built a factory in the Wiltshire town of Bradford-on-Avon.
1844: Charles Goodyear patented his vulcanised rubber process in the US, making possible the commercial use of rubber.
TODAY 1844: Charles Goodyear patented his vulcanised rubber process, making possible the commercial use of rubber.
London man Perry, meanwhile, came up with the rubber band after Charles Goodyear introduced rubber to the world in 1839, using it to hold paper or envelopes together.
1837 - American Charles Goodyear receives his first patent for rubber.
The first was Charles Goodyear, whose 1844 development of vulcanization made rubber soft, pliable and wearable.
The modern form of the game came with the invention of vulcanised rubber by Charles Goodyear in 1850, and in 1877, the first Wimbledon tournament was held on a rectangular court using the same set of rules that are used today.
Among leading American inventors are Alexander Graham Bell, Charles Goodyear, Cyrus McCormick, Dr.
In 1839, by inserting sulphur atoms as bridges between polymer chains, Charles Goodyear transformed Natural Rubber from an interesting curiosity into a superb engineering material that has had a huge impact on society.
1844: Charles Goodyear patented his vulcanised |rubber process in the US, making possible the commercial use of rubber.
* Charles Goodyear had been working on creating synthetic rubber for years when he accidentally let fly a sticky fistful of gum that landed on a hot potbellied stove.
* Charles Goodyear, who, back in the 1840s, was determined to overcome the two major flaws of natural rubber: It became solid and cracked in the cold of winter, and it melted into a "goo" in the heat.