Charles I


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Charles I 1

1600-1649.
King of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625-1649). His power struggles with Parliament resulted in the English Civil War (1642-1648) in which Charles was defeated. He was tried for treason and beheaded in 1649.

Charles I 2

1887-1922.
Emperor of Austria (1916-1918) and king of Hungary as Charles IV (1916-1918). Deposed after World War I, he twice failed to regain the Hungarian throne (1921).

Charles I 3

Charles I

n
1. (Biography) title as Holy Roman Emperor of Charlemagne. See Charlemagne
2. (Biography) title as king of France of Charles II (Holy Roman Emperor). See Charles II1
3. (Biography) title as king of Spain of Charles V (Holy Roman Emperor). See Charles V2
4. (Biography) title of Charles Stuart 1600–49, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625–49); son of James I. He ruled for 11 years (1629–40) without parliament, advised by his minister Strafford, until rebellion broke out in Scotland. Conflict with the Long Parliament led to the Civil War and after his defeat at Naseby (1645) he sought refuge with the Scots (1646). He was handed over to the English army under Cromwell (1647) and executed
5. (Biography) 1887–1922, emperor of Austria, and, as Charles IV, king of Hungary (1916–18). The last ruler of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, he was forced to abdicate at the end of World War I
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Charles I - as Charles II he was Holy Roman Emperor and as Charles I he was king of France (823-877)Charles I - as Charles II he was Holy Roman Emperor and as Charles I he was king of France (823-877)
2.Charles I - son of James I who was King of England and Scotland and Ireland; was deposed and executed by Oliver Cromwell (1600-1649)
3.Charles I - king of the Franks and Holy Roman EmperorCharles I - king of the Franks and Holy Roman Emperor; conqueror of the Lombards and Saxons (742-814)
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In Charles I.'s time Shoreditch was the dramatic quarter of London par excellence.--
Notable historical figures to have gone on trial in Westminster Hall included King Charles I, Guy Fawkes and Thomas More while many monarchs' coronation banquets took place there between the 12th and 19th century.
Charles I: Downfall Of A King BBC4, Tue, Wed & Thur, 9pm In this three-part series, continuing tomorrow and Thursday, historian Lisa Hilton discovers how, in just 50 tempestuous days, Charles I's rule collapsed, laying the foundations for civil war, the loss of Royal power and - ultimately - the King's head.
Charles I: Downfall of a King BBC Four, 9pm New series.
It has been a notable 12 months, starting with a superlative and historic recreation of Charles I's dispersed collection, moving through an energetic Summer Exhibition curated by Grayson Perry and leaving a permanent legacy with the unveiling of newly expanded premises to incorporate Burlington Gardens.
Adrian admits it could well be animals, but adds: "I'm happy to be told otherwise!" Recently, The Journal revealed another Tyneside pub claimed it may have captured the ghost of King Charles I on CCTV.
During the first civil war 1642-1646 Loughborough provided one of King Charles I's most important generals.
A Royal association captivated the audience with talk of the executed Charles I and his will to reign freely, against the will of Parliament.
It may have lost its head Nawaz Sharif but, like the British monarchy after Charles I's beheading, it can expect to draw upon a succession of Stuart/Sharif pretenders to his throne.
Visit farlamhall.co.uk 6 LEWTRENCHARD MANOR, LEWDOWN SLEEP in a four-poster bed that once belonged to Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria, at this ambitious rebuild of a Jacobean manor.
Visit farlamhall.co.uk LEWTRENCHARD MANOR, LEWDOWN SLEEP in a four-poster bed that once belonged to Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria, at this ambitious rebuild of a Jacobean manor.
Monarchists, by contrast, were those "whose loyalty to the concept of kingship did not necessarily stretch to a personal support of Charles I and Charles II during the Civil Wars" (21).