Charles VI


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Related to Charles VI: Henry V

Charles VI

n
1. (Biography) known as Charles the Mad or Charles the Well-Beloved. 1368–1422, king of France (1380–1422): defeated by Henry V of England at Agincourt (1415), he was forced by the Treaty of Troyes (1420) to recognize Henry as his successor
2. (Biography) 1685–1740, Holy Roman Emperor (1711–40). His claim to the Spanish throne (1700) led to the War of the Spanish Succession
References in classic literature ?
Charles VI relapsed six times into madness during the year 1399, sometimes during the new, sometimes during the full moon.
Where is the staircase, from which Charles VI. promulgated his edict of pardon?
VADUZ, Liechtenstein, July 15 (KUNA) -- Liechtenstein Principality celebrates this year the 300th anniversary of its foundation by Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI in 1719 as a sovereign state.
Henry V leads his men to combat, unlike his French counterpart King Charles VI. The surprising English victory boosts national morale, leading to English dominion over the continent.
| 1714 Treaty of Baden: Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI & France, ends War of Spanish Succession, French retain Alsace, Austria gets bank of Rhine.
King Charles VI of France and five noblemen were dancing at a ball when their costumes caught fire.
He had gone there to see 'Paris 1400: Art during the reign of Charles VI' yet, despite the Louvre show, no one else had seemed to notice that this limestone figure came from the canopy of the tomb of Charles VI and Isabeau de Baviere in Saint-Denis.
The queen thereby put trust in the army over the unreliable diplomacy of her father, Charles VI. That confidence began earlier with the rescue of Ferdinand II by mounted cuirassiers in 1619, Bassett argues, and continued uninterrupted until 1918.
After Zeno accepted an invitation in 1717 from Emperor Charles VI to act as imperial poet in Vienna, his dramas became even more elevated and more invested in noble themes.
There have been many different perspectives on the position Christine took in relation to the two major protagonists who divided the realm during the troubled reign of Charles VI (1380-1422): on one side, the king's uncle, Philip of Burgundy, and his son, Jean of Burgundy (who succeeded his father as Duke of Burgundy in 1304); on the other, the king's brother, Louis of Orleans, assassinated in 1307 at Jean's behest and succeeded by his son, Charles, Duke of Orleans (1394-1465), the celebrated poet.
The remaining Austrian branch became extinct in the male line in 1740 with the death of Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, and completely in 1780 with the death of his eldest daughter Maria Theresa of Austria.