chav

(redirected from Charva)

chav

 (chăv)
n. Chiefly British Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for a poor or uneducated young person, especially one who behaves in a brash or vulgar manner and wears ostentatious clothing and jewelry.

[Ultimately (possibly by back-formation from British slang chavvy, child) from Romani chavo, Romani boy, unmarried Romani man, from Middle Indic chāva, young of an animal, of unknown origin.]

chav

(tʃæv)
n
(Peoples) informal derogatory Brit a young working-class person whose tastes, although sometimes expensive, are considered vulgar by some
[perhaps from Romany chavi a child]
ˈchavish adj
Translations

chav

[ˈtʃæv] ncaillera
References in periodicals archive ?
"Charva is actually a Romany word meaning friend and is still used in parts of Morpeth, Alnwick and Hexham.
The play starts off in high comedy with two Charva brothers effing and blinding their way through a bungled burglary.
The difference was we never caused bother or harassed anyone and we were never served Asbos like the charva culture of today.
CRIB Where a charva sleeps: "Am gan yairm to me crib."
Well, it's the charva effect - the late-teens/early 20 year-olds who have, quite frankly, taken it too far.
The book includes a glossary of modern Geordie terms, including 'geet manka', (a big, horrible thing); 'cooncil telly', (terrestrial television); and 'charva cava', (cheap sparkling wine).
"It's Charva's Angels," they shouted before causing mass confusion at City Road's Egypt Cottage pub when they poked a trio of heads through the window and joined in with a karaoke rendition of Abba's Waterloo.
It aims to train yobs' parents how to teach their charva kids to behave properly.
Throw in grandad, charva Buster, best pal Winnie, whose husband is in hospital, a bogus raffle and an hysterical scene with condoms and you have, well, comic theatre at its ultimate best.
Still on the subject of words (and glossing over the fact that my neighbour announced she'd been drinking decapitated coffee all week) did you see that the new Collins English dictionary, the one that got charva so badly wrong, has announced that there are only 16 words in our language that are now considered taboo.
Running under the grammatically incorrect and offensive caption: 'Some geordie charva's, fighting with a gang of pakis', the 39-second video shows a gang of Asian teenagers charge down a street after a white lad who appears to be taunting them from the middle of the road.