Charybdis

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Cha·ryb·dis

 (kə-rĭb′dĭs)
n. Greek Mythology
A whirlpool off the Sicilian coast, opposite the cave of Scylla.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Charybdis

(kəˈrɪbdɪs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) a ship-devouring monster in classical mythology, identified with a whirlpool off the north coast of Sicily, lying opposite Scylla on the Italian coast. Compare Scylla
Chaˈrybdian adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cha•ryb•dis

(kəˈrɪb dɪs)

n.
1. a whirlpool in the Strait of Messina off the NE coast of Sicily.
2. a daughter of Gaea and Poseidon who was turned into a monster. Compare Scylla (def. 2).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Charybdis - (Greek mythology) a ship-devouring whirlpool lying on the other side of a narrow strait from Scylla
maelstrom, whirlpool, vortex - a powerful circular current of water (usually the result of conflicting tides)
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Charybdis

nCharybdis f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Charybdis

[kəˈrɪbdɪs] nCariddi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Steering our way through this Scylla and Charybidis of personification is helped by frequent evaluations of the system, in which users reveal the attributions--desired and not--that the system's behavior provokes.
Administrative reform, therefore, involves travelling back and forth between Scylla and Charybidis, with little hope of really getting it right.