slavery

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slav·er·y

(slā′və-rē, slāv′rē)
n. pl. slav·er·ies
1. The condition in which one person is owned as property by another and is under the owner's control, especially in involuntary servitude.
2.
a. The practice of owning slaves.
b. A mode of production in which slaves constitute the principal workforce.
3. The condition of being subject or addicted to a specified influence.
4. A condition of hard work and subjection: wage slavery.

slavery

(ˈsleɪvərɪ)
n
1. (Law) the state or condition of being a slave; a civil relationship whereby one person has absolute power over another and controls his life, liberty, and fortune
2. the subjection of a person to another person, esp in being forced into work
3. the condition of being subject to some influence or habit
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) work done in harsh conditions for low pay

slav•er•y

(ˈsleɪ və ri, ˈsleɪv ri)

n.
1. the condition of a slave; bondage.
2. the keeping of slaves as a practice or institution.
3. a state of subjection like that of a slave.
4. severe toil; drudgery.
[1545–55]
syn: slavery, bondage, servitude refer to involuntary subjection to another or others. slavery emphasizes the idea of complete ownership and control by a master: to be sold into slavery. bondage indicates a state of subjugation or captivity often involving burdensome and degrading labor: in bondage to a cruel master. servitude is compulsory service, often such as is required by law: penal servitude.

Slavery

See also captivity.

the movement for the abolition of slavery, especially Negro slavery in the U.S. — abolitionist, n.
the condition or quality of being a helot; serfdom or slavery. Also helotage, helotry.
1. the state or period of being indentured or apprenticed; apprenticeship.
2. the state or period of being a servant bound to service for a specified time in return for passage to a colony.
a doctrine that advocates slavery. — servility, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slavery - the state of being under the control of another personslavery - the state of being under the control of another person
subjection, subjugation - forced submission to control by others
bonded labor - a practice in which employers give high-interest loans to workers whose entire families then labor at low wages to pay off the debt; the practice is illegal in the United States
servitude - state of subjection to an owner or master or forced labor imposed as punishment; "penal servitude"
serfdom, serfhood, vassalage - the state of a serf
2.slavery - the practice of owning slaves
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
3.slavery - work done under harsh conditions for little or no pay
toil, labor, labour - productive work (especially physical work done for wages); "his labor did not require a great deal of skill"

slavery

noun enslavement, servitude, subjugation, captivity, bondage, thrall, serfdom, vassalage, thraldom My people have survived 300 years of slavery.
freedom, liberty, emancipation, release, manumission
Quotations
"There're two people in the world that are not likeable: a master and a slave" [Nikki Giovanni A Dialogue [with James Baldwin]]
"Slavery they can have anywhere. It is a weed that grows on every soil" [Edmund Burke On Conciliation with America]

slavery

noun
A state of subjugation to an owner or master:
Translations
عُبودِيَّهعَمَل شاق وأُجْرَة مُنْخَفِضَهنِظام العُبودِيَّه
otroctvíotrokářstvíotročina
slaverislave
orjuus
òrælahaldòrælavinnaòrældómur
otročinaotrokárstvo
suženjstvo
slaveri
kölelikkölelik sistemizor ve ücreti düşük iş

slavery

[ˈsleɪvərɪ] Nesclavitud f

slavery

[ˈsleɪvəri] nesclavage m
to be sold into slavery → être vendu(e) en esclavageslave ship nnavire m négrierslave trade ncommerce m des esclaves

slavery

nSklaverei f; (= condition)Sklavenleben nt; (fig: = addiction) → sklavische Abhängigkeit (to von); she was tired of domestic slaverysie hatte es satt, sich immer im Haushalt abrackern zu müssen

slavery

[ˈsleɪvərɪ] n (condition) → schiavitù f; (system) → schiavismo
to reduce to slavery → schiavizzare

slave

(sleiv) noun
1. a person who works for a master to whom he belongs. In the nineteenth century many Africans were sold as slaves in the United States.
2. a person who works very hard for someone else. He has a slave who types his letters and organizes his life for him.
verb
to work very hard, often for another person. I've been slaving away for you all day while you sit and watch television.
ˈslavery noun
1. the state of being a slave.
2. the system of ownership of slaves.
3. very hard and badly-paid work. Her job is sheer slavery.
References in classic literature ?
Primitive communism, chattel slavery, serf slavery, and wage slavery were necessary stepping-stones in the evolution of society.
They have purchased your slave judges, they have debauched your slave legislatures, and they have forced to worse horrors than chattel slavery your slave boys and girls.
Here was a population, low-class and mostly foreign, hanging always on the verge of starvation, and dependent for its opportunities of life upon the whim of men every bit as brutal and unscrupulous as the old-time slave drivers; under such circumstances immorality was exactly as inevitable, and as prevalent, as it was under the system of chattel slavery. Things that were quite unspeakable went on there in the packing houses all the time, and were taken for granted by everybody; only they did not show, as in the old slavery times, because there was no difference in color between master and slave.
It took all of the 19th century, from Toussaint's Haiti in the 1790s to Lincoln's USA in the 1860, to Brazil and Cuba in the 1880s, to uproot chattel slavery from the modern world.
On Coerced Labor: Work and Compulsion After Chattel Slavery
In doing so, we can see three strong threads of evidence supporting the idea that the primary cause behind southern secession was the desire to maintain the institution of chattel slavery. Those threads are: 1) Five southern states wrote formal "Declaration[s] of Causes" during this time, stating explicitly that the reason for secession was to maintain slavery.
Was he really saying they were better off under slavery, that he would have favored slavery back then, that they should have stayed in slavery, that he would like to see them in chattel slavery once again?
The following sample list of entry subjects may provide a sense of the scope of the encyclopedia section: Aborigines' Protection Society, Alexander II (the tsar who abolished serfdom), Lavrenty Beria (who oversaw the forced labor camps of the Soviet Union's NKVD), cane harvesters, chattel slavery, child labor, concubines, debt slavery, economic globalization, anti-colonial intellectual Frantz Fanon, American abolitions William Lloyd Garrison, human trafficking, illegal migration, Jim Crow laws, the Koran and antislavery, Nazi slavery, nongovernmental organizations, prison labor, Sex Workers Union of Cambodia, social reintegration of former slaves, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and World Trade Organization.
Tomkins tries to resolve some of those seeming contradictions by showing Wilberforce as the epitome of a godly paternalist who could combat the excesses of the ancien regime, such as chattel slavery and bull-baiting, while at the same time defending his deeply held faith against radicals and pornographers by means of the suppression of civil liberties.
Greener and Kenney's article makes me think of another possible solution: How about a return to chattel slavery? Then we could deny education, health care and citizenship to "illegals" and their offspring while guaranteeing us generations of defenseless workers to do the jobs we citizens deem too damn hard.