Chekiang


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Che·kiang

 (chŭ′kyäng′, jŭ′gyäng′)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Chekiang

(ˈtʃɛˈkjæŋ; -kaɪˈæŋ)
n
(Placename) a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for Zhejiang
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Zhe•jiang

(ˈdʒœˈdʒyɑŋ)

also Chekiang



n.
a province in E China, on the East China Sea. 42,940,000; 39,300 sq. mi. (101,800 sq. km). Cap.: Hangzhou.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Colonel Doolittle and his crew were more fortunate; after bailing out, they were rescued by sympathetic Chinese and smuggled by river into Chekiang Province.
Chekiang, Sept.4(SUNA)-President of the Republic, Field Marshal Omer Al-Bashir arrived Friday evening in Zhejiang Province of the People's Republic of China on a two-day visit.
Distribution: China: Hainan, Kwangtung, Kiangsi, Chekiang, Fukien, Yunnan; Taiwan; Thailand; Laos; Myanmar; Malaysia; India; Vietnam: Yen Bay [probably = current Yen Bai Province], Phu Lang Thoung [= Phu Lang Thuong, part of Bac Giang Province] (Giordani Soika, 1982 (1981)).
In 1955 he was consecrated bishop of the diocese of Chekiang (Zhejiang).
When he first arrived in China in 1854, Robert Hart (1835-1911) was a nineteen-year-old student interpreter in the British Consular Service and was assigned to Ningpo, a commercial town in Chekiang with a foreign community of about twenty-five consular officials, merchants, and missionaries.
Most of the planes crash-landed in China after the raid, in the region around Chekiang, and many of the crews escaped with the help of local Chinese.
This trade was generally routed through Fukien and Chekiang where it was carried aboard junks operated by Chinese and Japanese merchants.
Chekiang: Lung chiung hsien, Hu 409 (type, probably M).
The cartouche of Chekiang Province is perhaps the first European depiction of Chinese cotton-making.
The evidence is based on the writings of participants and later imperial histories Table 3 China's population by province, 1819-1953 (million) 1819 1893 1953 Provinces most affected by 153.9 101.8 145.3 Taiping rebellion (a) Provinces affected by Muslim 41.3 26.8 43.1 rebellions (b) Ten Other Provinces of China 175.6 240.9 338.6 Proper (c) Three Manchurian Provinces (d) 2.0 5.4 41.7 Sinkiang, Mongolia, Tibet, 6.4 11.8 14.0 Ningsia, Tsinghai Total 379.4 386.7 582.7 (a.) Anhwei, Chekiang, Hupei, Kiangsi, Kiangsu; (b.) Kansu, Shensi, Shansi; (c.) Fukien, Honan, Hopei, Hunan, Kwangsi, Kwangtung, Kweichow, Shantung, Szechwan and Yunnan; (d.) Heilungkiang, Kirin, Liaoning.