Chekist


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chekist

(ˈtʃɛkɪst)
n
a member of the Cheka
adj
of or pertaining to the Cheka

Chekist

a member of the Russian secret police (1917-1922) called Cheka.
See also: Occupations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Compare and contrast Zinn's idiom with the following Chekist tripe, nigh inescapable in Australian undergraduate humanities departments during my youth--this is from Georg Lukacs, History and Class Consciousness, 1923:
Socor, Vladimir, "Soviet Chekist, Slavic Fist, and the Medvedev-Yanukovych Declaration on Transnistria", Eurasia Daily Monitor, Volume: 7, Issue: 97, The Jamestown Foundation, 19 May 2010.
Another intriguing clue was the name of a leading chekist, Gen.
Lenin himself echoed this view but also found, on some occasions, that even the Cheka could not be trusted to root out counterrevolutionaries; then he proposed relying on a "good Communist," for "if it is a good Communist, and a good Communist is a good Chekist," then he'll get the job done.
The Chekist enforcers--members of the ubiquitous secret services--are aided by an increasing number of collaborators who join up in hopes of personal benefits or fear of the consequences of refusal.
In particular, Homecoming is upset with Chekist Street, which honors the state security organization of the early Soviet Union.
Interestingly and perhaps tellingly, Pavlovsky recommended a single-bullet shot, a reminder of the Chekist assassinations in the South Caucasus in 1920-21 as Bolshevik forces moved South.
Many post- 1991 films instead look backwards to analyze their own history, such as Burnt By the Sun, East-West, Inner Circle, and The Chekist.
And five months after Babel's arrest, a young Chekist dropped in to collect "trousers, socks, and handkerchiefs for Babel.
American journalist Eugene Lyons, visiting Russia in the 1930s, fell in with various former Chekist hoodlums who drank themselves stuporous to blot out the memories of their job.
For example, the Ballerina uses the veil to drag the head of either Chekist (her lover-enemy) or possibly John the Baptist (a reference to a ballet she dances).
While Melgunoff does not mention Beria, who was already active as a T chekist organizer in Georgia and Transcaucasia, he names many of his immediate colleagues.